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Does Evolution Favor Schizophrenia?

New evidence supports the theory that positive selection of genes associated with schizophrenia may play a role in the persistence of the disorder.

Schizophrenia occurs in one per cent of human populations around the world.

The preferred selection despite strong effects on reproductive fitness and its high heritability from generation-to-generation is consistent with the long-standing theory that schizophrenia represents, in part, a maladaptive by-product of adaptive changes during human evolution – possibly to do with aspects of creativity and human cognition.

“The world-wide presence of this disorder at an appreciable frequency, despite its impact on human health and reproductive fitness, is somewhat of a paradox,” said Dr Steve Dorus from the University of Bath, who worked with Dr Bernard Crespi from Simon Fraser University (Canada) and Dr Kyle Summers from East Carolina University (USA) on the research.

“This may be explained by the existing theory that the condition represents, in part, a by-product of adaptive changes during human evolution.

“Our finding that positive evolutionary processes have impacted genes underlying the disorder is consistent with this idea.

“However, the selective forces influencing the evolution of these genes remain unknown.

“Given the complex genetic nature of the condition, selection may be mediated by a diverse array of neurodevelopmental, neurophysiological and psychological mechanisms.

“Schizophrenia has also been associated with creativity throughout recorded history, but whether this link has a genetic basis is certainly not yet clear.”

The researchers analysed the molecular evolution of the 76 genes that have the strongest genetic association with the disorder.

They surveyed human polymorphisms – discrete changes in the human genome that vary between individuals – for very recent selective events within specific human populations.

They also compared genes between mammalian species to identify selection on primate lineages salient to the evolution of humans and the disorder.

The research identified evidence for positive selection on a variety of genes, including three genes that have the best functional or reproducible associations with the disorder: disrupted in schizophrenia (DISC1), dystrobrevin-binding protein 1 (DTNBP1) and neuregulin 1 (NRG1).

“For the first time it is possible to complement our genetic understanding of the disorder with substantial evolutionary and comparative genomic analyses,” said Dr Dorus.

“Decades of intensive research, using association and inheritance studies between affected and non-affected siblings, has resulted in a much clearer understanding of the genetic basis of the disorder.

“Hopefully, a better understanding of the evolution of the substrates underlying the disease will assist in characterizing how they are dysregulated in the disorder.

“Understanding the impact of positive selection may also help refine hypotheses concerning genetic links between schizophrenia and aspects of human creativity and cognition.”

The research was funded in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, East Carolina University and the National Institutes of Health.

Source: University of Bath

Does Evolution Favor Schizophrenia?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Does Evolution Favor Schizophrenia?. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/09/06/does-evolution-favor-schizophrenia/1235.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.