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Origin of Anxiety and Panic Disorder

MRIA computer game modeled on the iconic Pac Man collection is being used to learn how our brain reacts to an impending threat. Scientists believe an overreaction in the brain’s protective response can lead to anxiety and panic disorders.

In the study, Wellcome Trust scientists used brain imaging techniques to identify how the brain response changes as a threat is perceived to be imminent.

Researchers posit that malfunctions in the brain’s system to protect against threats may result in an over-exaggeration of the threat, leading to increased anxiety and, in extreme cases, panic says Dr. Dean Mobbs, lead author on the study.

“Although brain-imaging studies like ours cannot directly help to cure such disorders, they do improve our understanding of how the emotional system operates. This is the first step to helping people with anxiety-related disorders.”

When faced with a threat – such as a large bear – humans, like other animals, alter their behavior depending on whether the threat is close or distant. This is because different defense mechanisms are needed depending on whether, for example, the bear is fifty feet away, when being aware of its presence may be enough, or five feet away, when we might need to fight or run away.

To investigate what happens in the brain in such a situation, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London created a game where subjects were chased through a maze by an artificial predator – if caught, they would receive a mild electric shock. The researchers then measured their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

The results are published in the journal Science.

When the artificial predator was in the distance, the researchers observed activity in lower parts of the prefrontal cortex just behind the eyebrows. Activity in this area – known as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex – increases during anxiety and helps control strategies on how to respond to the threat.

However, as the predator moved closer, the brain activity shifted to a region of the brain responsible for more primitive behaviour, namely the periaqueductal grey. The periaqueductal grey is associated with quick-response survival mechanisms, which include fight, flight and freezing. This region is also associated with the body’s natural pain killer, opioid analgesia, preparing the body to react to pain.

Dr Dean Mobbs from UCL, lead author on the study, says: “Without fear, animals would not react to threats. This is a poor survival strategy and makes it more likely that the animal will be eaten and not pass on its genes.

“The most efficient survival strategy will depend on the level of threat we perceive. This makes sense as sometimes being merely wary of a threat is enough, but at other times we need to react quickly. The closer a threat gets, the more impulsive your response will be – in effect, the less free will you will have.”

Source: Wellcome Trust

Origin of Anxiety and Panic Disorder

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Origin of Anxiety and Panic Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/08/29/origin-of-anxiety-and-panic-disorder/1206.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 28 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 28 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.