Home » News » Relationships » Sexuality » Insecurity Undermines Relationships

Insecurity Undermines Relationships

coupleA new study gives valuable insights on how people manage romantic relations, highlighting the importance of outlook on life and internal acceptance of self and security.

Researchers at the University of Illinois explored the choices people make in simulated online dating relationships.

By standardizing the behavior of the romantic “partner,” the study provides a unique observation on how each participant’s outlook influences his or her choices and satisfaction with the romance.

The research finding is published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

The online study took participants through a series of scenarios about a relationship with a fictional partner. Each scenario ended with two options, from which the participant chose his or her response.

“The interesting thing is that all the participants were reacting to the same person, the same scenario,” said psychology graduate student Amanda Vicary, a co-author on the study with psychology professor R. Chris Fraley.

“And yet the pattern of their responses was quite different.”

Vicary and Fraley modeled their study on a 1979 Random House interactive fiction series, “Choose Your Own Adventure,” which allowed the reader to select from multiple options at critical points in the story. Each choice directed the reader to a new scenario.

This approach appealed to the researchers because earlier studies of individual behavior in relationships asked participants to make choices based solely on descriptions of isolated events. The sequential nature of the new study was more like an actual relationship, Vicary said, in that it involved ongoing interactions with the same partner.

The online study began with an assessment of participant attachment styles. A series of questions about how much the person trusts, confides in or relies on a current or former romantic partner allowed the researchers to profile the participant’s level of security or insecurity, anxiety, or intimacy-avoidance in romantic relationships. Fraley is a creator of this Experience in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) inventory, a tool for measuring participants’ attachment styles.

After completing the ECR-R inventory and reading instructions, participants answered a series of 20 relationship questions. Each question described an event in the relationship and gave the participant an opportunity to select one of two options for responding to the event. One of the options enhanced the relationship; the other undermined it.

The study included three experiments, each involving a different group of participants. In the first, all participants read the same story and selected from the same options at the end of each scenario. In the second, a participant interacted with either a supportive or unsupportive partner throughout the exercise. In both experiments, the participants’ choices had no influence on the behavior of their partners or on the scenarios.

In the third experiment, however, their choices did influence the simulated partners’ responses. If the participant made a relationship-enhancing choice, he or she got a positive verbal response from the simulated partner and then moved to a new scenario involving a supportive version of that partner. Making a negative choice elicited a negative, rejecting response from the partner and a new scenario in which the partner behaved in an unsupportive way.

The researchers found that a participant’s attachment style (that is, secure or insecure, anxious or intimacy-avoidant) was a good predictor of the pattern of his or her choices.

“People who are highly insecure are more likely to interpret their partners’ actions in a negative way and then choose to respond in kind,” Vicary said. The more secure individuals more often chose the positive, relationship-enhancing options.

As they progressed through the list of scenarios, most of the participants increased the rate at which they made positive choices. The anxious or avoidant participants increased their relationship-enhancing choices more gradually than their peers, however. This was true even in the third experiment, when their choices elicited immediate feedback in the form of a positive or negative response.

“It is interesting that even when highly insecure individuals experience responses as a direct function of their actions, they are still relatively slow to adopt beneficial relationship choices,” the authors wrote.

“It is possible that insecure individuals simply do not realize the detrimental impact that their actions have on their relationships.”

Not surprisingly, participants who interacted with supportive partners were quicker to make positive choices and tended to be more satisfied with the interaction.

The researchers also found that the nature of the choices each participant made determined his or her satisfaction with the simulated relationship: The more positive choices he or she made, the more satisfied the participant was with the relationship at the end of the experiment.

“This finding is noteworthy because it demonstrates that one’s own internal dynamics affect relationship satisfaction independently of the behavior of one’s partner,” the authors wrote.

Source: University of Illinois

Insecurity Undermines Relationships

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Insecurity Undermines Relationships. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/08/08/insecurity-undermines-relationships/1111.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.