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Why Kids of Divorced Parents Divorce

RingsIs the chance of divorce a genetically inherited risk, or a by-product of the environment? A new study investigates why children of divorced parents are roughly twice as likely to see their relationships end in divorce as compared to their peers from intact families.

Study authors discovered the parents’ divorce itself, not genes or even problems such as parental substance abuse or delinquency, played a key role in the failed unions.

Brian D’Onofrio, assistant professor at Indiana University Bloomington, said that when a host of variables are taken into consideration, such as genetic risks and socioeconomic factors, the actual divorce still accounts for around 66 percent of the increased risk of divorce faced by children of divorced parents.

“This means the transmission is not due to psychological or substance abuse problems that are passed from parents to the offspring,” he said.

“It’s something very unique about the separation of one’s parents. The societal implications are very important because divorce is such a painful experience for both adults and children. This further suggests that interventions specifically targeted at the consequences of divorce are important for our society.”

Many communities across the United States have formal and informal programs geared toward helping families cope with divorce. Some courts, for example, require parents to take classes that discuss the impact of divorce on children, D’Onofrio said.

D’Onofrio’s findings appear in the August issue of Journal of Marriage and Family.

The researchers used a novel research design–the study of the children of twins–to test assumptions in traditional family studies. The design helps investigate the role that genetic and environmental factors play when studying how parents influence their offspring.

Scientists are able to take into consideration a host of genetic and environmental variables, both those already measured by other researchers and those yet unmeasured, because the offspring of twins have more genetic risk and environmental factors in common than unrelated people.

D’Onofrio said the findings are important in light of the national debate about the meaning of marriage.

“This study, because it tested a lot of the assumptions of previous research, further supports the conclusion that if we reduce parental divorce or its impact on children, that we can reduce the number of divorces in our society in future generations.”

D’Onofrio’s study tests assumptions and rules out potential causes, but it does not identify why children of divorced parents experience the increased risk. Previous studies, he said, point to a lack of commitment among these offspring. But he cautioned that not all children of divorced parents should be painted with the same brush.

The research is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the W. T. Grant Foundation, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression.

Source: Indiana University

Why Kids of Divorced Parents Divorce

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Why Kids of Divorced Parents Divorce. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/07/12/why-kids-of-divorced-parents-divorce/1002.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.