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Self-Esteem Comparable Across Cultures

A new study suggests the perception that East Asians are self-effacing and possess a low self-esteem, as compared to Americans, is incorrect.

Researchers from the United States, China and Japan used newly developed measures to investigate self-esteem on more expansive basis than prior assessment tools have allowed.

The scientists used the new scales to study implicit, or automatic, self-esteem comparing parallel samples of university students from the three countries.

Surveying more than 500 students, they found that implicit, or automatic, self-esteem was strongly positive among students from each of the nations.

The consistency of the findings across cultures was so clearly apparent that the researchers conclude in this month’s issue of the journal Psychological Science that high implicit self-esteem may be culturally universal.

The researchers used the Implicit Association Test (IAT) created by University of Washington psychologist Anthony Greenwald and a co-author of the study, to probe the students’ positive associations with themselves.

Different versions of the test have been widely used to investigate automatic attitudes and evaluations such as racial bias, and gender and age stereotypes. In this study it was used to provide an index of self-esteem.

Psychologists previously equated self-esteem with the extent to which people describe themselves as having positive characteristics. These self-descriptions are called explicit self-esteem and are measured by asking for agreement with statements such as “I feel that I have a number of good qualities.”

No questions are asked to measure implicit self-esteem. Instead the test measures how rapidly a person can give the same response to words that are pleasant and words that refer to one’s self.

Although East Asians are perceived by both others and themselves to be modest and self-effacing, the test results painted a different picture.

Students from all three countries had highly positive implicit self-esteem, with the Japanese students showing especially higher self-esteem than their Chinese and American counterparts.

“Ordinary East Asians are aware that they hold strongly positive self-views. But the prevalent modesty norm prevents them from expressing it publicly,” said Susumu Yamaguchi of Tokyo University and lead author of the study.

“The IAT successfully unraveled East Asians’ unexpressed self-esteem in our study.” The authors speculate that cross-cultural similarities in positive implicit self-esteem may arise from cross-cultural similarities in child-rearing.

“It may be that parents in all societies, especially mothers, adore their children and put them on a pedestal so that children worldwide absorb a highly positive self-concept,” Greenwald said.

“In Japan the culture explicitly tells you that you are not better than others. But this culturally approved explicit self-concept doesn’t remove the base of adoration created by parents and other relatives since childhood. In China, where there is pressure for having smaller families, children are perhaps more precious than they were years ago.”

Mahzarin Banaji, a Harvard psychologist, co-developer of the test and co-author of the study said: “When we see cultural variation in human behavior, we understand that societies and cultures mold their members in different ways. When we see cultural invariance, as we do here in East-West self esteem, we understand that we are also all the same.”

Source: University of Washington

Self-Esteem Comparable Across Cultures

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Self-Esteem Comparable Across Cultures. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/06/07/self-esteem-comparable-across-cultures/881.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.