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Improve Depression Among Elderly

A new study suggests treatment of depression among the elderly can be improved by adding a second medication to a standard treatment regimen. The adjunct pertains to those who do not adequately respond to the first-course therapy or those who relapse from it. And, up to 84 percent of the elderly who experience depression either fail to respond to first-course treatment or relapse during the first six to 12 weeks of treatment.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine study is published in the June issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

The study found that adding a second drug to the treatment of depressed participants over the age of 70 who either did not respond to initial treatment with the antidepressant paroxetine and interpersonal psychotherapy, or to those who responded to the initial treatment but quickly relapsed, caused the likelihood of recovery to rise from 40 percent to 60 percent. Recovery was slower in those who did not respond to the original treatment.

“Depression should not be considered a normal part of aging. The scientific evidence is growing that there are a number of effective treatment options available for people of all ages,” said Mary Amanda Dew, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry, psychology and epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh and lead author of the study.

The University of Pittsburgh researchers followed 105 adults aged 70 or older who had major depressive disorder and who did not respond to standardized treatment of paroxetine and interpersonal psychotherapy or who did respond but experienced an early recurrence of depressive symptoms.

Participants were given one of three augmenting agents: sustained-release bupropion, nortriptyline or lithium. Researchers selected the additional agent that each participant received based on individual medical status and history. Thirty-six participants either declined new medicine or did not receive augmentation because of accompanying medical conditions.

Half of the patients who did not respond to the initial treatment responded to the augmentation therapy. It took a median 28 weeks for the participants to achieve recovery. Of the patients who relapsed after the initial therapy, 67 percent recovered after augmentation over a median recovery time of 24 weeks. Of the patients who responded to the first-course therapy of paroxetine and psychotherapy, 87 percent achieved recovery.

“While the recovery rates of those receiving augmentation are not as high as in those who responded to first-line therapy, the recovery rates are still high enough to suggest that augmentation should be tried when older adults’ depression is not improving,” said Dr. Dew.

Source: University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Improve Depression Among Elderly

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Improve Depression Among Elderly. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/06/01/improve-depression-among-elderly/868.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 28 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 28 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.