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Counseling Instead of Pharmacy for Depression

A new study suggests some ethnic minorities are skeptical of the benefits of medication and prefer counseling and prayer for their depression. And, since the effectiveness of pharmaceutical treatment of depression is associated with individual compliance–that is, pill administration the knowledge of this preference may have significant clinical benefit.

A national Internet study found that some minorities were in fact, twice as likely as white and Native American people to prefer cognitive rather than pharmaceutical treatment.

African-Americans, Hispanics and Asians who took the survey were skeptical about the biological basis of depression and wary of becoming addicted to antidepressants, according to Jane Givens, M.D., of Boston University Medical Center and colleagues.

The survey results appear in the latest issue of the journal General Hospital Psychiatry.

“This study documents that, overall, ethnic minorities hold attitudes toward depression and depression treatment that are distinct from those of white participants,” Givens said.

The findings are important because studies show that while minority and white populations suffer from similar rates of depression, diagnosis and treatment are less likely for members of minority populations.

Junling Wang, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of Tennessee, College of Pharmacy, recently published a study showing that African-American and Hispanic patients use SSRI antidepressants, which include commonly prescribed medications such as Prozac and Zoloft, less often than white patients do.

Although Wang and her fellow researchers thought SSRI use might signal improved access to health care, “we did not study whether the lower use of SSRIs is indicative of fewer health care visits or a lower change of being diagnosed with depression among minorities,” she said.

For their study, Givens and colleagues surveyed people with the help of an anonymous Internet depression-screening test offered free on the health information Web site InteliHealth, owned by Aetna US Healthcare. The researchers collected information from 78,753 people who had taken the test between January 1999 and April 2002.

“To our knowledge, there are no prior studies examining ethnic variations in treatment preferences for depression or other illnesses among Internet users,” said the study’s senior author, Lisa Cooper, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University.

Nearly 65 percent of those surveyed said they would be most worried about their employers finding out about their depression diagnoses, although many said they would be concerned about the reaction of friends and family as well.

The survey also uncovered other surprising treatment preferences among the groups. For instance, African-American and Hispanic participants were more likely to prefer a doctor of the same sex to treat their depression than white participants.

African-Americans surveyed had a strong preference for a doctor of the same ethnicity, while Asians, Hispanics and Native Americans were less likely than white participants to want a doctor from their own ethnic background.

The Aetna Foundation Quality Care Research Fund supported the study.

Source: Health Behavioral News Service

Counseling Instead of Pharmacy for Depression

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Counseling Instead of Pharmacy for Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/05/18/counseling-instead-of-pharmacy-for-depression/835.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.