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Medication Aids Parkinson’s

Researchers discover a medication significantly helps Parkinson Disease patients by reducing troublesome symptoms, enhancing emotional well-being, lowering depression and providing a boost to overall quality of life.

Ropinirole 24-hour prolonged release was found to reduce individuals daily “off” time in which Parkinson’s symptoms like tremor, slowness, stiffness, and walking difficulty return as drugs wear off.

The study is published in the April 3, 2007, issue of Neurology®, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study involved 393 people with Parkinson disease who weren’t responding optimally to the widely used treatment for Parkinson, levodopa. For the study, half of the group took the prolonged release version of the drug ropinirole, called ropinirole 24-hour, and levodopa for six months. The other half took placebo and levodopa. Other Parkinson disease medications were not changed during the study.

Researchers found those people taking the drug reduced their average daily “off” time by 2.1 hours compared to .3 hours in the placebo group.

“Ropinirole 24-hour prolonged release, when taken with levodopa, is effective in reducing daily ‘off’ time for Parkinson patients who aren’t getting the best results from levodopa,” said study author Rajesh Pahwa, MD, with the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kansas, and Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology.

“We also found the drug helped improve quality of life and motor function.”

Among those taking ropinirole, researchers found significant improvements in troublesome Parkinson symptoms, quality of life, depression, emotional well-being, stigma, and sleep. Over half of the people in the ropinirole group were classified as much improved” or “very much improved” compared to 14 percent in the placebo group. Those taking ropinirole were also able to reduce their dosage of levodopa.

According to the study, common side effects were involuntary movements, nausea, dizziness, drowsiness, hallucinations, and sudden drops in blood pressure. The 24-hour prolonged release ropinirole appears to be as effective as immediate release ropinirole and better tolerated.

Source: American Academy of Neurology

Medication Aids Parkinson’s

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Medication Aids Parkinson’s. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 24, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/04/04/medication-ups-quality-of-life-for-parkinsons/728.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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