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Path to Parkinson’s Disease

Researchers report the absence of a single brain molecule can allow either internal or external influences to trigger the development of Parkinson’s disease.

Currently, the cause of most cases of Parkinson’s disease is unexplained. If additional research confirms the finding, strategies to prevent, delay or reduce the severity of Parkinson’s disease may be on the horizon.

Parkinson’s disease is a disease in which nerve cells in part of the brain called the substantia nigra die, resulting in the loss of dopamine, a nerve-signaling molecule that helps control muscle movement. The absence of dopamine from these cells, called dopaminergic neurons, causes a loss of muscle control, trembling and lack of coordination.

Using mouse models, investigators at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital determined a particular molecule, stands like a sentry at the crossroads of several biochemical pathways, any one of which can lead to Parkinson’s disease.

The degeneration of brain cells that occurs in Parkinson’s disease may be caused by either externally provoked cell death or internally initiated suicide when the molecule that normally prevents these fatal alternatives is missing.

The researcher is reported in an article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The molecule that prevents damage to the substantia nigra is an enzyme called GST pi (“pie”). The job of the antioxidant GST pi is to protect the cell from death caused by either environmental toxins (externally evoked cell death), such as herbicides and pesticides, or a self-destruction process called apoptosis (cell suicide), triggered by certain stressful conditions in the cell.

If GST pi levels are reduced or this enzyme is overwhelmed by toxins, these nerves are at increased risk of death. Previous research has shown that the ability of GST pi to protect cells against toxic molecules is directly linked to the ability of cancer cells with excessive amounts of this enzyme to reduce the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

The finding that GST pi plays a key role in preventing Parkinson’s disease suggests that measuring levels of this enzyme might be an effective way to determine individuals at risk for developing this disease, according to Richard Smeyne, Ph.D., an associate member of the Department of Developmental Neurobiology at St. Jude.

“In the future, treatments that increase GST pi levels in the substantia nigra might help to prevent or delay the onset of Parkinson’s disease or reduce its severity,” said Smeyne, the report’s senior author.

GST pi is one of a family of similar enzymes that eliminate free radicals generated by pesticides and other chemicals. Two members of this family are present in the brain, but only one of them, GST pi, is found in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. Free radicals are highly unstable molecules that readily interact with other molecules, causing cell damage.

The study sheds light on the cause of most cases of Parkinson’s disease, which currently are unexplained. “The majority of these cases of Parkinson’s disease appear to arise because individuals who have a genetic susceptibility to the disease are exposed to environmental toxins such as pesticides and herbicides, which trigger the formation of free radicals that kill dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra,” Smeyne said.

“We also know that GST pi blocks the process of cell suicide triggered by stresses that the cell can’t overcome, such as an increase in the presence of free radicals or a loss of the cell’s ability to produce energy.”

Results of the St. Jude study showing the importance of GST pi could help to explain previous work by other researchers linking loss of this enzyme to destruction of dopaminergic neurons. For example, there is some evidence that alterations in the gene for GSP pi are linked to increased risk of Parkinson’s disease after pesticide exposure.

Also, although most Parkinson’s disease cases have no known cause, experts believe that they are caused by the interaction of genetic susceptibility to Parkinson’s disease with exposure to a variety of environmental factors, such as pesticides and herbicides.

“Therefore, the new findings bring researchers a step closer to understanding why Parkinson’s disease occurs and potentially how to develop more effective treatments for it,” Smeyne said.

Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Path to Parkinson’s Disease

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Path to Parkinson’s Disease. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/02/06/path-to-parkinsons-disease/599.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.