advertisement
Home » News » Lifestyle Changes Can Decrease ED

Lifestyle Changes Can Decrease ED

A new study clearly identifies the widespread prevalence of erectile dysfunction in America as more than 18 million men over the age 20 report the disorder. A new study finds ED is strongly associated with age, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and a lack of physical activity.

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity and measures to prevent cardiovascular disease and diabetes, may also prevent decreased erectile function.

The study is published in the February 1, 2007, issue of the American Journal of Medicine.

“Physicians should be aggressive in screening and managing middle-aged and older patients for erectile dysfunction, especially among patients with diabetes or hypertension,” said Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, MPH, lead author of the study and a faculty member in the Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology.

“The associations of erectile dysfunction with diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors may serve as powerful motivators for men who need to make changes in their diet and lifestyle.”

For the study, the research team analyzed data from 2,126 men who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Men who reported being “sometimes able” or “never able” to get and keep an erection were categorized as having erectile dysfunction, while men who reported being “always or almost always able” or “usually able” were not.

The overall prevalence of erectile dysfunction among men in the United States was 18 percent. Men aged 70 and older were much more likely to report having erectile dysfunction compared to only 5 percent in men between the ages of 20 and 40. Nearly half of all men in the study with diabetes also had erectile dysfunction.

And, almost 90 percent of all men with erectile dysfunction had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease, including diabetes, hypertension, having poor cholesterol levels or being a current smoker. Men with erectile dysfunction were also less likely to have engaged in vigorous physical activity within the month prior to participation in the study.

Source: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Lifestyle Changes Can Decrease ED

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Lifestyle Changes Can Decrease ED. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/02/01/lifestyle-changes-can-decrease-ed/590.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.