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Women with Migraines at Risk for Depression

According to a new study, women who experience chronic headaches, especially migraines, are four-times as likely to report symptoms of major depression as individuals who have episodic headaches. Women with chronic headaches also report feeling tired and frequently suffer severe physical maladies.

The study of more than one thousand women enrolled in headache clinics in five states, is found in the January 9, 2007, issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Of the women surveyed, 593 reported episodic headache (fewer than 15 headaches per month) and 439 had chronic headache (more than 15 headaches per month). Ninety percent of the women were diagnosed with migraines.

The study found women with chronic headache were four times more likely than those with episodic headache to report symptoms of major depression.

Chronic headache sufferers were also three times more likely to report a high degree of symptoms related to headache, such as low energy, trouble sleeping, nausea, dizziness, pain or problems during intercourse, and pain in the stomach, back, arms, legs, and joints.

Among patients diagnosed with severely disabling migraine, the study found the likelihood of major depression increased 32-fold if the patient also reported other severe symptoms.

“Painful physical symptoms may provoke or be a manifestation of major depression in women with chronic headache, and depression may heighten pain perception,” said study author Gretchen Tietjen, MD with the University of Toledo-Health Science Campus and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

“This relation between migraine and major depression suggests a common neurobiology.”

Tietjen says studies are underway to test whether severe headache, severe physical symptoms and major depression may be linked through dysfunction of serotonin in the central nervous system.

“Regardless of what’s causing the link between migraine and depression, psychiatric disease such as depression complicates headache management and can lead to poorer outcomes for headache management,” said Tietjen.

Source: American Academy of Neurology

Women with Migraines at Risk for Depression

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Women with Migraines at Risk for Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/01/09/women-with-migraines-at-risk-for-depression/532.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.