Home » Disorders » Depression » Asking for Antidepressant Elevates Evaluation

Asking for Antidepressant Elevates Evaluation

Individuals who inquire about the need for antidepressant medication generally receive a more thorough evaluation for depression, than those that do not ask, or ask for a specific brand name medication. Additionally, general request for antidepressants increased the likelihood that patients would be screened for the existence of suicidal acts or impulses, according to a new study published in the December issue of Medical Care.

The study was designed to evaluate physician behavior as related to consumer (patient) advocacy and direct advertising by pharmaceutical companies. Research was led by an investigator at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in collaboration with researchers from the University of California, Davis and the University of Rochester.

The findings confirm earlier investigations that found patients’ requests had a profound effect on physician prescribing habits regarding both major depression and the psychological condition known as adjustment disorder, which involves depression and anxiety in response to pain or a major event, such as illness or divorce.

“Our new research extends those findings by examining the impact of patient requests on the level of history-taking carried out by the physician and by exploring the association of history-taking with diagnostic accuracy as well as provision of acceptable initial care for depressed patients,” said lead author Mitchell Feldman, MD, MPhil, professor of medicine at UCSF, and an internist at UCSF Medical Center.

The study was conducted with 18 “standardized patients” — actors who are specifically trained to portray patients in medical education settings. Each “patient” portrayed a role involving one of two clinical presentations: major depression accompanied by carpal tunnel syndrome or an adjustment disorder accompanied by low back pain. The standardized patients were also trained to request an anti-depressant medication by brand name, or request a general anti-depressant, or not ask for medication.

A total of 298 visits to 152 internists and family physicians in four health care organizations in California and New York took place during the study. The physicians did not know that their appointments were with standardized patients as opposed to real patients, but they did give their permission to be part of the study and were told that the visits were audio recorded and would be examined for content following each interaction.

The researchers studied physician history-taking patterns, examining whether a diagnosis of depression was placed in the medical record, the length of the visit, and whether minimally acceptable initial depression care had been provided.

Minimally acceptable depression care is defined as any combination of the following steps — prescribing an antidepressant prescription, providing a mental health referral, or giving a follow-up visit within two weeks of the initial visit.

Study findings showed that requests for general antidepressant medication were associated with an increase in depression-specific history-taking by physicians. On average, physicians asked 0.80 more questions than if no request was made, while brand-specific requests were only marginally associated with an increase in questions (0.45 more questions).

“It may be that physicians see a request for a general medication as an invitation for further discussion about the diagnosis and treatment options, whereas brand-specific requests may be heard as a consumer demand for medical services in response to emotional persuasion rather than high-quality information,” said Feldman.

A greater amount of time spent by the physician in depression history-taking was also directly associated with both the likelihood of a diagnosis of depression being made in the patient’s medical record and the provision of minimally acceptable initial depression care.

Findings also showed that physicians obtained more extensive depression-related history from patients who portrayed major depression with carpal tunnel syndrome compared to those who portrayed an adjustment disorder accompanied by low back pain (6.7 questions compared to 5.2 questions).

Patient requests for medication did not appear to distract physician attention from treating the coexisting musculoskeletal conditions presented by patients in the study, and the researchers found no evidence to support the assertion that requests reflecting direct-to-consumer advertising distract the physician from taking a complete medical history. Instead, the research team concludes that a patient request for medication serves to increase the thoroughness of depression history-taking, including inquiries about suicide.

“Patients should be educated advocates for their own quality health care, but if they become over-focused on wanting a particular treatment rather than the most appropriate treatment in general, the result may be missed opportunities and diminished quality of care,” Feldman added.

Source: University of California – San Francisco

Asking for Antidepressant Elevates Evaluation

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Asking for Antidepressant Elevates Evaluation. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/12/11/asking-for-an-antidepressant-elevates-evaluation/468.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.