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Quality of Life after Hormone Therapy

A clinical trial reviewing postmenopausal hormone therapy finds the therapy did not improve women’s overall quality of life. The study, conducted in Estonia, found no differences among women receiving hormones compared to a group that did not receive the therapy, although the hormones did benefit women that experienced hot flashes and night-time sweating.

These results were obtained from the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial (EPHT) funded by the Academy of Finland and conducted under the leadership of Research Professor Elina Hemminki from the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (Stakes).

The trial examined the effects of hormone therapy on utilization of health care services, onset of illnesses, and well-being.

Estonia was selected for the trial because hormone therapy is already established in Finland and physicians have a very positive attitude towards its use. Hormone therapy is still rare in Estonia.

In 1999–2001, 1,823 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 64 were recruited in the Tallinn and Tartu regions. The women took the research medication for 2 to 5 years.

Quality of Life after Hormone TherapyHormone therapy led to an increased number of health care visits and increased treatment costs. In comparison to the control group, more lower abdominal ultrasounds and electrocardiograms were performed on the group receiving hormone therapy, but there were no differences in the number of gynecological or breast surgeries, bone density measurement or mammography.

The women receiving hormone therapy showed slightly more cardiovascular disease, cerebral circulatory disease and cancer in comparison to the women who did not take hormones. However, these differences were not statistically significant. The hormone recipients had less fractures and less hot flashes and night-time sweating than the comparison group, but they also had more flow. There were no differences in depression, sleep disorders, fatigue, dizziness or bloating.

The EPHT trial is the first European randomized controlled long-term hormone therapy trial. The women in this trial were younger than those in the American WHI study completed earlier. Furthermore, the effect of postmenopausal hormones on use of healthcare services was studied for the first time. In addition to Stakes, other participants in the trial were the University of Tampere, the University of Tartu and the National Institute for Health Development (TAI) from Estonia.

Source: Academy of Finland

Quality of Life after Hormone Therapy

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Quality of Life after Hormone Therapy. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/11/06/quality-of-life-after-hormone-therapy/389.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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