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Depression More Serious For Males?

The November issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter discusses a condition that most individuals would believe to be equally devastating for both genders – depression. However, the perception is misleading as depression occurs more frequently among women, yet often presents special and serious problems for males.

In the United States, about half as many men as women are diagnosed as being seriously depressed at some time in their lives. But this relatively low rate could be an illusion. Men often don’t like to admit that they are depressed, so they are more likely to withdraw into silent misery or hide depression under anger, irritability, alcoholism, or drug abuse.

man_computer_blueDepression can be an even more serious matter for men than for women. To begin with, it is a key risk factor for suicide, and men commit suicide four times more often than women do. Another mortal concern for men with depression is cardiovascular disease. Depression affects blood pressure, blood clotting, and the immune system. It’s a well-known risk factor for heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke. Men are especially vulnerable because they develop these diseases at a higher rate and at an earlier age than women.

“The most important thing others can do for a man who shows signs of depression is to help him contact a physician or mental health professional,” says Dr. Michael Miller, editor in chief of the Harvard Mental Health Letter. “If necessary, accompany him to treatment and encourage him to continue until his symptoms improve.”

Source: Harvard Mental Health Letter

Depression More Serious For Males?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Depression More Serious For Males?. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/10/24/depression-more-serious-for-males/355.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.