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Memory Loss Needs Medical Attention

As the ranks of baby boomers over the age of 60 multiply, a new study warns that significant memory loss should be medically evaluated and closely monitored over time. While mild memory loss is a component of aging, a significant reduction in memory could mean that brain tissue is reduced. Early detection is vital as new medications are developed to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s.

The study will be published in the September 12, 2006, issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study, which looked at 120 people over the age of 60, found people who complained of significant memory problems but still had normal performance on memory tests had reduced gray matter density in their brains even though they weren’t diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is a transition stage between normal aging and the more serious problems caused by Alzheimer’s disease.

When compared to healthy individuals, the study found people who complained of significant memory problems had a three-percent reduction in gray matter density in an area known to be important for memory; there was a four-percent reduction among individuals diagnosed with MCI.

“Significant memory loss complaints may indicate a very early “pre-MCI” stage of dementia for some people. This is important since early detection will be critical as new disease modifying medications are developed in an effort to slow and ultimately prevent Alzheimer’s disease,” said study author Andrew Saykin, PsyD, Professor of Psychiatry and Radiology at Dartmouth Medical School in Lebanon, New Hampshire, and an affiliate member of the American Academy of Neurology.

While normal aging, MCI and Alzheimer’s disease have been associated with the loss of gray matter in the brain, this is believed to be the first study to quantitatively examine the severity of cognitive complaints in older adults and directly assess the relationship to gray matter loss.

Saykin says the findings highlight the importance of cognitive complaints in older adults, and suggest that those who complain of significant memory problems should be evaluated and closely monitored over time. Memory complaints, a cardinal feature of MCI which confers high risk for Alzheimer’s disease, are reported in 25 to 50-percent of the older adult population.

The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging, the Alzheimer’s Association, the Hitchcock Foundation, the Ira DeCamp Foundation, the National Science Foundation, New Hampshire Hospital and the National Alliance for Medical Image Computing.

Source: American Academy of Neurology

Memory Loss Needs Medical Attention

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Memory Loss Needs Medical Attention. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 27, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/09/12/memory-loss-needs-medical-attention/259.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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