Middle-class working couples struggle to achieve a lifestyle they are happy with or desire. The reason, according to sociologist Phyllis Moen is that the working couples must compete in job environments designed for single earners with no family responsibilities.

Moen, McKnight Presidential Chair in Sociology at the University of Minnesota, says that couples still are operating under outdated work policies and practices and institutional and organizational rules designed for a one earner, one homemaker model.

“Middle class couples are stretched thin in terms of time by “work-friendly” jobs,” said Moen. “In part this reflects the realities of a global information economy with its speed-ups, pressures to increase productivity, 24-7 availability by computer, downsizing insecurities, expectations of long hours and little schedule flexibility.”

In her paper, Moen describes evidence that middle class dual-earner couples, who appear advantaged given their education and resources, are nevertheless stretched thin. In fact, fewer than one in six qualify as “super couples” (those where both husband and wife have a high quality of life). And those who fit this category tend to be couples with no children.

In about half of the 1,060 couples she studied, Moen found that both the husbands and wives reported either low quality of life or only adequate — what she calls “good enough” — quality of life. Women working in job environments that are insecure or offer them little scheduling flexibility and control are unlikely to have individual or couple life quality.

Source: University of Minnesota