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Biochemical Link for Alcoholism and Anxiety

A study reported in the August 9th issue of the Journal of Neuroscience finds that a brain protein controls or regulates anxiety and drinking behavior. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago discovered the level of the protein found in two areas of the brain, influences the behaviors in rats.

In previous studies, the UIC researchers had first identified a gene that controls anxiety and alcohol consumption.

“We knew that gene, called CREB, controls the expression of a number of important genes in the brain,” said Dr. Subhash Pandey, professor of psychiatry and anatomy and cell biology at UIC and Jesse Brown VA medical center and lead author of the paper.

In the new study, they showed that a protein made by one of those CREB-controlled genes affects anxiety and drinking behavior depending on its level in two areas of the brain.

Pandey and his colleagues injected DNA of complementary sequence to the gene of the protein, called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), into the brains of rats to block the gene from expressing BDNF. The “anti-sense” DNA was injected into three areas of the amygdala, an area of the brain associated with emotion and fear.

The researchers found that when levels of BDNF in the central and medial areas of the amygdala were lowered, anxiety and alcohol consumption increased. Decreased levels of BDNF in the third area, called the basolateral amygdala, had no effect.

When levels of BDNF in the central and medial amygdala were restored to normal by injecting BDNF, anxiety and alcohol consumption diminished.

The researchers measured anxiety by observing the rat’s exploratory behavior in a maze. Alcohol consumption was measured by offering the animals one drinking bottle with water and one with alcohol, and noting the proportion of alcohol imbibed.

BDNF plays a vital role in the growth and maintenance of neurons. Many human studies have suggested that variations in the BDNF gene may be associated with alcoholism and anxiety disorders, Pandey said.

“In people, alcoholism is very frequently associated with anxiety disorders,” he said. “And it is well established that high levels of anxiety promote alcohol consumption and also play a crucial role in relapse to alcohol drinking.”

Pandey said the new research may suggest a target for drugs to treat or prevent anxiety and alcoholism.

“Our study suggests a molecular, neurochemical mechanism in the amygdala which may be responsible for the association of high levels of anxiety with excessive alcohol-drinking behavior,” he said.

Source: University of Illinois at Chicago

Biochemical Link for Alcoholism and Anxiety

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Biochemical Link for Alcoholism and Anxiety. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 20, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/08/09/biochemical-link-for-alcoholism-and-anxiety/168.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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