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Watching TV Lowers Physical Activity

In the first study to be based on objective measurements, rather than subject-recall—that is relying on an individual’s memory of their activity level—scientists have found that the more television people say they watched the less active they were.

A study of low-income housing residents used pedometers to accurately calculate daily activity levels. Researcher discovered that each hour of television viewing was associated with a 16 percent less likely chance to achieve the recommended daily activity level of 10,000 steps per day.

The study will be published online by the American Journal of Public Health on July 27 and later in the journal’s September 2006 issue.

“Clearly the more time a person spends watching television the less time they have to be physically active, and in many lower income communities, other factors might have influenced the study participants’ decisions to spend time watching television,” said the paper’s lead author, Gary Bennett, PhD, of Dana-Farber’s Center for Community-Based Research and the Harvard School of Public Health.

These factors may include fear of street crime and poor maintenance of parks and playground equipment, which create barriers to outdoor activities. Older people were particularly prone to staying indoors and watching television, which reflects their increasing isolation in society today, Bennett said.

The study involved 486 low-income housing residents in Boston. The study participants tended to be black or Hispanic, older, and female. Two-thirds were overweight or obese, 37 percent had less than a high-school education.

To avoid the potential inaccuracies associated with self-reported physical activity, the researchers arranged to have the study participants wear pedometers during their waking hours to count the number of steps they took every day for five days. The pedometers were “blinded” to prevent the participants from knowing how many steps they had taken and possibly altering their normal patterns of activity. The participants also reported the number of hours they watched television.

Results showed that the participants watched an average of 3.6 hours a day of television, with some reporting spending no time watching television while others watched as much as 14.5 hours on weekdays and 19 hours on weekend days.

Researchers have estimated that 10,000 steps a day measured with a pedometer roughly approximates recommended daily activity levels. In the current study, on an average day, each hour of television viewing was associated with 144 fewer steps walked – or an average of 520 fewer steps a day for those who spent 3.6 hours in front of the television.

In addition, for each hour of television they watched, participants were 16 percent less likely to achieve the 10,000-step-per-day goal. For those who watched the 3.6-hour-a-day mean value, their odds of walking 10,000 steps a day were 47 percent less than non-television-watchers.

The study findings represent “a piece of a larger puzzle for us – how do we help people to become more active?” said Bennett. Simply telling people not to watch television “doesn’t work terribly well,” he explained, and often leads to substituting other sedentary activities like reading and computer use.

Going forward, “we need to do a better job of understanding the factors that lead people to be physically active,” Bennett said. “This is an important area of research, particularly because the impact of physical inactivity disproportionately affects the health of lower income Americans.”

Source: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Watching TV Lowers Physical Activity

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Watching TV Lowers Physical Activity. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/07/28/watching-tv-lowers-physical-activity/138.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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