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System Fails to Provide Care for Many Suicidal Adults

A new study finds that many adults who contemplate suicide do not seek help from a doctor or mental health professional, and even those who do ask for help may find it difficult to obtain adequate treatment or medication.

In the report, co-authored by University of California in Los Angeles sociologist Ruth Klap PhD, experts analyzed information garnered from a telephone survey of 7,896 adults. Those who reported thoughts of suicide within the past year were asked whether they sought treatment from a doctor or counselor or took medication for mental health or drug or alcohol problems.

“We need to improve access to treatment for people with suicide ideation,” said Klap. “There is a problem with perceived need for care,” and even among those who realize they need it, “there are a substantial number who don’t get care.”

Only 3.6 percent of the study respondents reported having suicidal, but of these, 74 percent had symptoms of a serious psychiatric disorder, most commonly depression. A little over half (56 percent) believed they needed care from a doctor or mental health professional.

But the results also suggest that even suicidal adults who ask for help may not get it. Forty-four percent of the suicidal adults had visited a primary care doctor for help with an alcohol, drug or mental health disorder, but only a quarter of suicidal adults received treatment from a mental health professional.

“People suffering from a significant mental disorder may find it difficult to navigate the health care system and ask for the treatment they need,” said Heather V. Krell, M.D., a psychiatrist at UCLA not affiliated with the study.

“People feeling suicidal may be inhibited by the stigma of it,” Krell said. Lack of motivation and energy may also pose a problem for suicidal adults who recognize they need help.

Both family members and mental health care professionals have a responsibility to help suicidal adults get the care and treatment they need, Krell said.

This research was funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Institute of Mental Health and published in General Hospital Psychiatry , a peer-reviewed research journal.

Source: Health Behavior News Service

System Fails to Provide Care for Many Suicidal Adults

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). System Fails to Provide Care for Many Suicidal Adults. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 24, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/07/14/system-fails-to-provide-care-for-many-suicidal-adults/96.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.