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Did Drug Approval Process Understate Antidepressant Dangers?

Is the regulatory process slanted toward manufacturers with dangerous and in fact deadly results? The July 8 British Medical Journal carries an article tracking the safety data presented to the FDA and suggests the process obscured the increased risk of suicidal behavior in adults receiving antidepressant medications.

The article comes on the heels of GlaxoSmithKline’s recent letter to doctors pointing to a six-fold increase in the risk of suicidal behavior in adults taking paroxetine, a new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). The challenge to balance the risks verse benefits of new pharmaceuticals remains an open ended question. In the comment, Professor David Healy examined the regulatory process and asks were mistakes made and could they have been avoided?

Healy’s review found a February 1990 article raising concerns that the recently licensed fluoxetine might trigger suicide acts in depressed patients. Subsequent trials showed a doubling of rates of suicidal acts between active treatment and placebo, but it was only in a recent study reviewing over 700 trials that this difference became significant.

This trend should have been seen by both companies and regulators as something that required investigation, writes the author.

Trials in children conducted from the mid-1990s also show a doubling of the risks of suicidal acts with SSRIs. These results have recently formed the basis of warnings about the use of SSRIs in children. Trials in adults show a similar risk ratio yet, until May 2006, no warnings were issued for adults.

“Although data submitted to the FDA show an excess of suicides with every antidepressant licensed since 1987 compared with placebo, this simple but crucial finding continues to be obscured,” he says.

He also examines the way in which the data were presented to regulators by manufacturers, and suggests that inappropriate inclusion of suicidal acts in the placebo group biased estimates of suicide risk. Subsequent “rigid interpretation” of these data by the regulators “may have delayed warnings of dangers of suicidal acts,” he adds.

Having re-analysed the evidence, he suggests that the best estimate for the likely risk of suicide on SSRIs over placebo is 2.6 (more than double the risk) and he calls for suitably powered studies to settle the issue.

He also believes that greater data transparency and statistical sophistication might lead to earlier research to discriminate between those who do well on new drugs and those who do not.

“The regulators seem stuck in a world where balancing evidence of potential benefit against actual risk causes real problems,” he writes. “The SSRI and rofecoxib disasters have harmed public confidence in drugs. We urgently need to learn how to regulate both the risks and benefits of new treatments more effectively.”

BMJ Editor, Fiona Godlee also touches on this issue in her Editor’s choice column. She talks of “an overpowerful under-regulated drug industry and a research establishment and publishing industry in its thrall.” A radical solution would be to stop allowing drug companies to evaluate their own products. Is this feasible? Is it the answer? she asks.

The article is found in BMJ Volume 333 pp 92-5.

Source: British Medical Journal

Did Drug Approval Process Understate Antidepressant Dangers?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Did Drug Approval Process Understate Antidepressant Dangers?. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2006/07/07/did-drug-approval-process-understate-antidepressant-dangers/75.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 27 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 27 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.