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Disruptive, Impulse-Control & Conduct Disorders

Pyromania is an obsessive desire or irrestistible impulse to set fire to things. The following are pyromania symptoms:

Deliberate and purposeful fire setting on more than one occasion.

Tension or affective arousal before the act.

Fascination with, interest in, curiosity about, or attraction to fire and its situational contexts (e.g., paraphernalia, uses, consequences).

Pleasure, gratification, or relief when setting fires, or when witnessing or participating in their aftermath.

The fire setting is not done for monetary gain, as an expression of sociopolitical ideology, to conceal criminal activity, to express anger or vengeance, to improve one’s living circumstances, in response to a delusion or hallucination, or as a result of impaired judgment (e.g., in dementia, mental retardation, substance intoxication).

The fire setting is not better accounted for by conduct disorder, a manic episode, or antisocial personality disorder.

Pyromania Symptoms

Disruptive, Impulse-Control & Conduct Disorders

Trichotillomania is primarily characterized by the recurrent pulling out of one’s own hair. Hair pulling may occur from any region of the body — such as your scalp, eyelids or eyebrows. Less common areas where trichotillomania occurs includes pulling out facial hair, pulling out hair from your arms, legs, armpits, or pubic hair. Hair pulling sites may vary over time.

The prevalence of this disorder is approximately 1 – 2 percent of the population. It occurs more frequently in females than males (10:1 ratio).

Specific Symptoms of Trichotillomania

1. Recurrent pulling out of one’s hair resulting in noticeable hair loss.

2. Repeated attempts to decrease or stop the hair pulling.

3. The disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

4. The disturbance is not better accounted for by another mental disorder (such as trying to improve a perceived defect or flaw in body dysmorphic disorder) and is not due to a general medical condition (e.g., a dermatological condition).

 

Updated for DSM-5. Code: 312.39 (F63.2)

Trichotillomania Symptoms

Disruptive, Impulse-Control & Conduct Disorders

The essential feature of transient tic disorder is the presence of single or multiple motor tics and/or vocal tics. The tics occur many times a day.

A tic is a sudden, rapid, recurrent, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movement or vocalization. The vocal tics include various words or sounds such as clicks, grunts, yelps, barks, sniffs, snorts, and coughs.

Specific Symptoms of Transient Tic Disorder

 

Note: This disorder has been replaced in the updated 2013 5th Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) and renamed to “provisional tic disorder”. This entry now exists here for historical/informational purposes. See new criteria for provisional tic disorder.

Transient Tic Disorder Symptoms

Disruptive, Impulse-Control & Conduct Disorders

The essential feature of intermittent explosive disorder is the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in serious assaultive acts or destruction of property (Criterion A). The degree of aggressiveness expressed during an episode is grossly out of proportion to any provocation or precipitating psychosocial stressor (Criterion B).

A diagnosis of intermittent explosive disorder is made only after other mental disorders that might account for episodes of aggressive behavior have been ruled out (e.g., antisocial personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, a psychotic disorder, a manic episode, conduct disorder, or attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder) (Criterion C). The aggressive episodes are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., head trauma, Alzheimer’s disease) (Criterion C).

The individual may describe the aggressive episodes as “spells” or “attacks” in which the explosive behavior is preceded by a sense of tension or arousal and is followed immediately by a sense of relief. Later the individual may feel upset, remorseful, regretful, or embarrassed about the aggressive behavior.

Specific Symptoms of Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Several discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in serious assaultive acts or destruction of property.

The degree of aggressiveness expressed during the episodes is grossly out of proportion to any precipitating psychosocial stressors.

The aggressive episodes are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g., antisocial personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, a psychotic disorder, a manic episode, conduct disorder, or attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder) and are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., head trauma, Alzheimer’s disease).

Aggressive behavior can occur in the context of many other mental disorders. A diagnosis of intermittent explosive disorder should be considered only after all other disorders that are associated with aggressive impulses or behavior have been ruled out.

Intermittent Explosive Disorder Symptoms

Disruptive, Impulse-Control & Conduct Disorders

Kleptomania symptoms include:

Recurrent failure to resist impulses to steal objects that are not needed for personal use or for their monetary value.

Increasing sense of tension immediately before committing the theft.

Pleasure, gratification, or relief at the time of committing the theft.

The stealing is not committed to express anger or vengeance and is not in response to a delusion or a hallucination.

Kleptomania Symptoms