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Surviving Honeymoon ‘Disasters’

Honeymoon couple romantic in love at beach sunset. Newlywed happWhether you’re driving to Maine or flying to Aruba, you expect your honeymoon to be perfect. Nothing but quality time with your new husband or wife in exotic surroundings, with delicious food, great entertainment, wonderful accommodations and plenty of sun.

What could possibly go wrong?

Although you’re most likely to have a foolproof wedding trip, it is possible to experience a few setbacks.

Below are some possible honeymoon “disasters” and how to cope with them:

Sickness

Your uncle has a raging cold. He breathes on you before you can steer clear. On the second day of your honeymoon in Niagara Falls, you’re sick in bed with a horrible sore throat and a runny nose.

What to do?

Try to rest. Order room service for every meal. Eat a lot of chicken soup. Watch classic old movies. Sleep. This is a preview of “normal” married life. Get used to it.

Rain

The beach is lovely. The sand is clean and sparkling. The waves are cool and inviting. All of a sudden, a storm blows in. It’s raining on your honeymoon.

The weather has a way of doing what it will even if it is your wedding trip. Be prepared for rainy days by bringing a good book and a deck of cards. Be safe, not sorry; stick a rain jacket and/or umbrella in your suitcase.

Menstruation

Gals, can you believe it? Your period is due the first day of your honeymoon. How are you supposed to have romantic interludes like this?

If you want to temporarily do away with your period, ask your gynecologist about menstrual shifting or menstrual suppression. With the use of birth control pills, both procedures prevent you from menstruating at certain, crucial times.

Missed Connection

You’re running late, and you get a traffic ticket on the way to the airport. You tell the policeman you’re on the way to your honeymoon, but it doesn’t faze him. You run to the gate, but you miss the flight. You’re going to be late to embark on your cruise. Now, what?

This isn’t a problem because you purchased travel insurance.

Being Robbed

Your husband has just lost his credit cards and $481.00. You didn’t have much in your purse. Just your passport, $20 and a lipstick. Now what?

Report the crime to the police. Then, contact the American Embassy. Staff there will help you get another passport and can assist in having money wired to you. Don’t forget to report missing credit cards to your credit card companies.

Sound scary? Don’t fret. There are ways to reduce the risk of being robbed:

    1. Before you leave, read all the travel information on the U.S. Department of State’s travel website, travel.state.gov. This information could save your money and your life.
    2. Buy a money belt and keep money and credit cards in it.
    3. Leave expensive jewelry at home.
    4. Invest in Traveler’s Cheques.

Disappointing Sex

Ladies, you’re a virgin. You’re dying to have sex, but you’re a little nervous. Your husband is gentle, but it still hurts.

The remedy for disappointing sex, whether it be painful sex, or sex that happened too quickly, or just awkward sex, is patience. It takes a while for people to get used to each other. Cuddling helps.

It will get better.

Boredom

Can you believe it? You’re on this cruise, and all there is to do is eat. Or so you think.

For boredom, do a little research and find fun activities for you and your spouse to enjoy. Read the cruise newsletter. Go to the spa and be pampered with a massage and a pedicure.

Talk to people, share ideas. Fun is just around the corner. You just have to find it.

Worrying That You Made a Mistake

You’re in the shower. You’re saying to yourself, “How could I have married this man/woman?” You’re convinced you made the biggest mistake of your life.

First of all, relax, everyone, whether he/she admits it or not, has doubts. You are not alone.

Sleep on it.

You’ll feel better in the morning.

Bad Accommodations

You wake up, and there are dozens of little bites on your body. Bed bugs!

Find another hotel. You deserve better accommodations on your honeymoon.

Fighting

You just got married. Now, you rush off to your honeymoon, and presto, you’re supposed to have a good time. But sometimes, it doesn’t work that way.

Fights occur for an infinite number of reasons, but they often flare up because you need your space. So keep yourself from calling him/her a jerk, excuse yourself, and wander down to, say, the gift shop. Buy yourself a soft drink and tell yourself to relax. A little time alone helps.

Conclusion

In conclusion, with all of the problems mentioned above, they are easier solved if you can somehow maintain your sense of humor and a feeling of inner peace.

It is the silly problems you’ll remember about your honeymoon.

In 20 years, you’ll be toasting your anniversary and giggling about how you spent three days of the trip in the local library because of pouring rain.

Don’t let the little “disasters” get you down.

Surviving Honeymoon ‘Disasters’


Laura Yeager

Laura Yeager has been writing for over 35 years. Some of her favorite topics include mental health, writing, religion, parenthood, dogs, and her day-to-day life. She is a mental health writer for PsychCentral.com. Her articles about writing have appeared in The Writer Magazine, The Toastmaster Magazine, writersweekly.com and authormagazine.org. Her spiritual writing has been featured in several venues including Aleteia USA, Busted Halo, The Liguorian Magazine, Canticle Magazine and Guideposts Magazine. A graduate of The Writers' Workshop at The University of Iowa, Laura teaches writing at Kent State University and online Creative Writing at Gotham Writers' Workshop in New York.


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APA Reference
Yeager, L. (2018). Surviving Honeymoon ‘Disasters’. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 14, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/blog/surviving-honeymoon-disasters/
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 8 Jul 2018
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 8 Jul 2018
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.