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Supportive Relationships More Protective Against Risk of Major Depression for Women Than for Men

Supportive Relationships More Protective Against Risk of Major Depression for Women Than for Men

Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) researchers have found that women who feel more loved and supported by their friends, relatives and children are less at risk for major depression than men, suggesting important gender differences in the pathways leading to depression.

In the February issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry, the VCU researchers report that among approximately 1,000 adult, opposite-sex, fraternal twin pairs, the female twins reported significantly higher levels of global social support than their twin brothers. The women were more sensitive than the men to the depressongenic effects of low levels of social support, particularly from the co-twin, other relatives, parents and spouses.

Supportive Relationships More Protective Against Risk of Major Depression for Women Than for Men

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APA Reference
Grohol, J. (2018). Supportive Relationships More Protective Against Risk of Major Depression for Women Than for Men. Psych Central. Retrieved on January 16, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/blog/supportive-relationships-more-protective-against-risk-of-major-depression-for-women-than-for-men/
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 8 Jul 2018
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 8 Jul 2018
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.