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World of Psychology


Optimists Live Longer, Study Finds

Optimists Live Longer, Study Finds

Patients who described themselves as highly optimistic had lower risks of all-cause death, and lower rates of cardiovascular death than those with high levels of pessimism, according to an article in the November issue of The Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. (Abstract here.)

According to the article, major depression is a known risk factor for cardiovascular death. However, the relationship between optimism and death has not received as much...
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Nicotine dependence & psychiatric disorders

Nicotine dependence & psychiatric disorders

Adults with nicotine dependence and/or psychiatric disorders consume 70 percent of all cigarettes smoked in the United States, according to results of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study reported in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry (Volume 61). Based on the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), the article provides the first national estimates among adults of the prevalence and co-occurrence of nicotine dependence and a broad array of other...
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Gambling among adolescents and young adults associated with psychiatric problems

Gambling among adolescents and young adults associated with psychiatric problems

Adolescents and young adults who gamble are more likely than nongamblers to have substance use disorders and psychiatric problems, according to an article in the November issue of The Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

According to the article, approximately 68 percent of the adult population gambled legally in the past year. Although most adults gamble responsibly, about 9 million are classified as problem gamblers and another 3 million as pathological...
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General

My Vote Counts, So Does Yours

I'm here to tell you who I'm voting for on Tuesday, and why. I'm voting for John Kerry this presidential election. Here's

John Kerry has served in the military. Bush did something while the Vietnam war raged, but what it is isn't exactly clear and he's never been willing to clear it up. I'd rather a Commander-in-Chief who has respect for the military and knows what it means to send 1,000 men to their...
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Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

Getting a Good Night's Sleep

Many people suffering from insomnia use sleep medications to help them nod off, but this isn't a good first choice for combating sleep problems.

"Natural sleep is healthier than drug-aided sleep. After taking sleep medications, people often feel hazy and detached when they wake up. In contrast, people who fall asleep naturally are more likely to wake up refreshed," Dr. Robert Ballard, director of the Sleep Center and National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, said in a prepared...
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Voting: A Healthy Habit

A vote for your favorite candidate may also be a vote for your good health.

Researchers say expressing your right to vote may help promote good mental health and, in turn, good physical health, but some people will likely benefit from voting more than others....
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Researchers: Stress Causes Forgetfulness

Researchers: Stress Causes Forgetfulness

Stressful situations in which the individual has no control were found to activate an enzyme in the brain called protein kinase C, which impairs the short-term memory and other functions in the prefrontal cortex, the executive-decision part of the brain, says Dr. Amy F. T. Arnsten of Yale Medical...
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Kerry, Bush Outline Health Plans

I'm not sure you caught this over at JAMA, but the US presidential candidates, Senator John Kerry and President George W. Bush, outline their plans for improving healthcare access and controlling costs. See the commentaries by John Kerry and George W. Bush.

For some real fun, come back here in 3 1/2 years and see how either one has made good (or failed to do so) on these...
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Cognitive behavioral therapy combined with antidepressant effective in treating adolescent OCD

Cognitive behavioral therapy combined with antidepressant effective in treating adolescent OCD

According to current epidemiological data, approximately 1 in 200 young people suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD patients 'obsess' about thoughts of bad things that can happen (obsessions) and perform repetitive, destructive actions (compulsions) as a means of dealing with those thoughts. OCD can cripple their lives, disrupt their learning, and drive a wedge through their families. Now, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine researchers, in conjunction with a team of researchers from...
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