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World of Psychology


Survey: U.S. residents addicted to e-mail

Survey: residents addicted to e-mail

residents are so hooked on e-mail that some check for messages in the bathroom, in church and while driving, a new survey sponsored by America Online Inc. has found.

The average e-mail user in the has two or three e-mail accounts and spends about an hour every day reading, sending and replying to messages, according to the survey, conducted by Opinion Research Corp.

E-mail dependency is so strong for 41% of survey respondents that they check their e-mail...

New study has surprise findings on childhood depression

New study has surprise findings on childhood depression

A child's social environment may have only a modest effect on whether very young children become depressed, according to new Australian research.

"Our study found that even dysfunctional family relationships and poor communication styles have a limited impact on the observed mental health of a child," Professor Jake Najman said. "This was contrary to our expectations."

Although they then go on to say this suggests that environmental and social factors play a lesser role in a child's depressive...

Love’s all in the brain: fMRI study shows strong, lateralized reward, not sex, drive

Love's all in the brain: fMRI study shows strong, lateralized reward, not sex, drive

You just can't tell where you might find love these days. A team led by a neuroscientist, an anthropologist and a social psychologist found love-related neurophysiological systems inside a magnetic resonance imaging machine. They detected quantifiable love responses in the brains of 17 young men and women who each described themselves as being newly and madly in love.

The multidisciplinary team found that early, intense romantic love may have more to...

Psychologist ponders: Is ‘The Cultural Animal’ free?

Psychologist ponders: Is ‘The Cultural Animal’ free?

Psychology these days is a battlefield between those who emphasize nature and those who emphasize culture. Evolutionary psychologists — scientists who study the biological basis for human behaviors and preferences — report the similarities between humans and other animals. The cultural psychologists focus on specific differences between cultures.

These two sides are not the full story, although they have yielded many insights. It helps to examine evolutionary differences: how humans and animals are different. Likewise, it is valuable...
Brain and Behavior

Watching New Love as It Sears the Brain – New York Times

Watching New Love as It Sears the Brain - New York Times (Free reg. req'd)


New love can look for all the world like mental illness, a blend of mania, dementia and obsession that cuts people off from friends and family and prompts out-of-character behavior - compulsive phone calling, serenades, yelling from rooftops - that could almost be mistaken for psychosis.

Now for the first time, neuroscientists have produced brain scan images of this fevered activity, before it settles into...

For some depressed kids, therapy may rival pills

For some depressed kids, therapy may rival pills

Cognitive-behavioral therapy may be just as effective as antidepressants for depressed teenagers in more affluent families, a government scientist reported Thursday.

But children with severe depression, regardless of family income, appear to need the medication to recover, said Benedetto Vitiello, chief of the child and adolescent psychiatry branch at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).
The issue of pills vs. therapy has taken on added urgency since the Food and Drug Administration ordered "black box labels" —...

Teen girls with ADHD at higher risk of mental illness

Teen girls with ADHD at higher risk of mental illness

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a serious problem for teenage girls, and those who have it appear to be at much higher risk for mental illness by age 17, a Harvard Medical School researcher reported Tuesday.

The largest, most thorough study so far comparing girls with ADHD with peers who don't have it underscores the importance of early diagnosis and treatment, says study leader Joseph Biederman, a child psychiatrist. He spoke at the American Psychiatric...

Sleeping on the job

Sleeping on the job


Most of us come up with our best ideas when we are about to nod off, says a study. So is it time the boss put beds in the workplace?

With longer working hours and shrinking lunch breaks, is it any surprise that stressed British workers find their bed a more creative space than the office?

Some 30% of people have their best ideas in bed compared to just 11% who have them at their desk, according to research by...