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Addiction

Psychology Around the Net: February 3, 2018


Well, ol' Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow yesterday, so we might be looking at six more weeks of winter -- "might," because he's usually wrong.

However, if he's right, there's plenty of cozy wintertime activities to get us through the days and nights when it's too cold or snowy to go out. One of my favorites? Reading! Coincidentally, in this week's Psychology Around the Net we have a list of 10 new mental health books out in 2018!

We also have the latest on the anti-diarrhea medicine overdoses, a psychologist's controversial research regarding how we distinguish physical features of gay and straight people, unusual habits that actually could have health benefits, and more.

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Antidepressant

When Your Antidepressant Isn’t as Safe as You Think


A fortunate knock of luck is always welcomed by scientists and researchers, yet any treatment modalities should be novel by design rather than by serendipity. Antidepressants were discovered by chance in the 1950s, and it seems that they suffer from specific deficiencies when it comes to their clinical effectiveness and safety profile. It is something that very few in the medical field negate, although the degree of disagreement may vary.

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General

Podcast: Is Marijuana Effective for Treating Mental Illness?

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales welcome Psych Central CEO and founder Dr. John Grohol to discuss marijuana and its potential benefits for treating various types of mental illnesses, from major depression to bipolar disorder. Dr. Grohol explains why there has been so little research in this field and why it will be quite some time before a significant body of data is accumulated. Also discussed is the question of why many people seem to believe cannabis is a “miracle drug,” and which age group should be most careful about the use of marijuana (or any mind-altering substance).
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Antipsychotic

Should You Let Your Doctor Monitor Your Medication Intake?

A new pill has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) that, when swallowed, notifies a monitoring device you wear that you actually took the medication. Sounds invasive and a gross violation of your privacy?

Well, it would be. Except for the small problem that every year, millions of people say or agree to take a medication, and then stop taking it when they start to feel better. It's a long-standing problem for people diagnosed with certain types of mental illness, and leads to serious and significant problems -- for the patient, their family, and society as a whole.

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Antidepressant

How I Dealt with Depression After Brain Surgery


Once again I was on the phone to my friend, sobbing. She’d put up with my tears every day since I left the hospital. Two or three daily meltdowns were the norm.

Many of my tears were over things that would have merely irritated me before: misplaced scissors, dirty socks in the middle of the living room, a brief computer glitch.

I have cavernous angiomas, tangles of malformed blood vessels, scattered throughout my brain. Two of them -- one larger than a golf ball in my right parietal lobe, and the other, smaller, in my brain stem -- had bled, and I underwent brain surgeries to remove them.
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General

Top 25 Psychiatric Medications for 2016

Most people understand that the role of psychiatric medications is to help alleviate the symptoms associated with different types of mental disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, anxiety, and others. Psychiatric medications are an important part of a comprehensive plan for effectively treating people who have a mental health concern or mental illness.

It's good to know what drugs are being prescribed most often for mental disorders in the U.S. These are the top 25 psychiatric medications by number of U.S. prescriptions dispensed in 2016, according to QuintilesIMS, a global information and technology services company.

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Caregivers

OCD & Exhaustion

When my son Dan’s obsessive-compulsive disorder was severe, he was always exhausted. At first, I attributed his lack of energy to the fact that he rarely slept well. But it soon became obvious, even when sleeping was not an issue, that he always felt tired.

Why?

I think there are many reasons why those with obsessive-compulsive disorder are often exhausted. Living with nonstop anxiety can be draining. Many people with OCD are also depressed, and depression and lack of energy often go hand in hand. Additionally, some medications used to treat OCD are known to cause fatigue.
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Bipolar

A Chemical Hiccup: Medicated Oblivion and Art

“I want to hold you in a warm Atlantic,
A sea of my own making, a meringue of lapis wine.”
It is bedtime, and I have swallowed my evening cocktail of bipolar drugs: 300 mg of Seroquel, the Lamictal, and, of course, the Clonazepam. The Seroquel silence is seeping in. I have about 20 minutes on this dead-end road. Soon, I will fall asleep, content and comfortable, a pleasant and sleeping “high-functioning bipolar,” but I will not get to think about what happens to that person in the warm waves of the Atlantic or find the rhythm that goes with my lapis wine.

Instead, I will forget about the beginnings of my poem in my own happy oblivion, and tomorrow I will pay the bills, maybe watch my favorite show on Netflix, and I will stop trying to knit these words together.
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Antidepressant

Can Anxiety and Panic Disorder Cause Depression if Left Untreated?

Mental health problems are infamously complicated. Although psychologists have a successful guidebook to identify and diagnose mental illness, those manuals are merely suggestions for treatment -- and can't predict exactly how you experience your psychological and emotional well-being. With that in mind, some people experience multiple forms of mental health disorders, often in various degrees. If somebody has several mental health conditions, it's known as "comorbidity," and anxiety and depression are the two most related diagnoses.

What Is Anxiety?
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Books

Psychology Around the Net: September 30, 2017


Ah, the leaves are changing and the air's getting crisper...goodbye September! I can't say I'll miss you (you kind of whizzed right on by?!) and October is my favorite month anyway!

This week's Psychology Around the Net covers the real psychology behind taking a knee, what really creates the "grit" personality trait, why some people don't need to hear "I love you" in relationships, and more.

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