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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Contribute to Brain Disorders?

There seems to be a lot of talk about Vitamin D deficiency lately, particularly in relation to brain disorders.

I’ve always associated vitamin D with healthy bones, but really, it is important for good overall health. Vitamin D helps our hearts, muscles, lungs and brains work well. Unlike other vitamins, most vitamin D does not come from what we eat, but rather from our exposure to the sun (and possibly from supplements).

With all the emphasis on staying out of the sun and/or wearing sunscreen these days, it’s not surprising that many of us are now deficient in vitamin D.

Another unique characteristic of vitamin D is the fact that our bodies turn it into a hormone called “activated vitamin D” or “calcitriol.”
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Brain and Behavior

The Connection Between Obesity and the Blood-Brain Barrier


The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important physiological formation tasked with protecting the brain from multiple chemicals that might circulate in our bloodstream. The BBB obstructs the exchange and movement of most molecules, cells, and proteins in and out of the central nervous system (CNS). This helps to keep the brain “cool” and unaffected by whatever we eat and the kind of infections we encounter.

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Brain and Behavior

Genealogy in the Psyche Department

Perhaps a psychological mapping of the human genome would tell us the future odds of being bullied in school, or of becoming a priest.

Genes inherited from the "family tribe" contribute to the formation of self through a complicated process that incorporates a fusion of interrelated factors: genetic traits, familial relationships, societal interactions, educational opportunities, random influences, etc.
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Brain and Behavior

Podcast: Why Do Some People Ignore Facts?

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales welcome Dr. Gleb Tsipursky to look at why some people hold their opinions, despite factual evidence to the contrary. In addition to explaining the reasons why some people ignore facts, the show offers suggestions on how to go about changing the mind of someone who does this, using the EGRIP approach. He also gives examples of how we can become more evolved thinkers, ourselves. Dr. Tsipursky also encourages the hosts to sign the Pro-Truth Pledge, a commitment to truth-oriented behavior. (Spoiler: they both already had!)
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Brain and Behavior

Why You Shouldn’t Give Up on Your New Year’s Resolutions

The time-honored tradition of making New Year's resolutions is deeply rooted in our modern culture. Perhaps because when it is a new year, we feel it's a good time for us also to be renewed. We can change. We can become a better person.

Somewhere between 40 and 50 percent of people make New Year's resolutions (American Medical Association, 1995; Epcot Poll, 1985). But how many people actually keep at least one of their resolutions?

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Brain and Behavior

How to Put Down Our Devices and Step Into Our Lives: Four Strategies for Finding Balance

I think it crept in insidiously. I saw others getting “addicted” to their phones, to social media, to needing to check their electronics constantly, and I wanted no part of it. I was the last stronghold to get a smartphone. I had no need or desire for one. While everyone else had one for years already, I was content with my “un-smart” phone, quite satisfied to set aside a few designated periods in my day to check emails, get on the internet, and do my other business from my computer -- and only when necessary.
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Anxiety and Panic

The Challenge of Staying High-Functioning While Battling Multiple Mental Illnesses

Recently I was attacked by several people online, saying I must not have “real” mental illness since I am able to work, be in grad school, and have stable friendships and a marriage. Those words hurt me deeply. I don’t know what constitutes “real” mental illness but I have dissociative identity disorder, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder. My everyday struggle is real.

Here are 10 things I want you to know about being high-functioning and managing multiple mental illnesses.
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Brain and Behavior

Meditations to Help You Calm Your Inner Critic


Our ability to be resonant with ourselves is a key for bringing healing into our life.

“Why am I so stupid?” “I am such a loser.” “Why can’t I do anything right?” These are just some of the questions that many people have running through their mind- sometimes without even realizing it. There is a way to heal this voice and cultivate more compassion for yourself.

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