Children and Teens

Psychology Around the Net: May 27, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

If you're here in the States, I hope you're enjoying your long holiday weekend; however, before you hit the outdoors take a moment to check out the latest in this week's mental health news! Learn about mindfulness-focused childbirth, why it's important for veterans to help other veterans with mental health, how one of the most well-known billionaires today achieves happiness, and more.

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Alzheimer

New Clinical Trials Try Unorthodox Ways to Target Alzheimer’s


Alzheimer’s disease affects an estimated 5 million individuals in the US and causes a devastating loss of cognitive function due to the buildup of beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain. Previous efforts to combat this disease have focused on developing drugs that target beta-amyloid, but such treatments have been unsuccessful in patients so far. Several exciting new approaches for treating Alzheimer’s are currently being tested in clinical trials in the US and Europe. These trials will assess the efficacy of an anti-viral drug that is normally used to treat herpes, and a new vaccine that generates antibodies against tau protein.

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Depression

What I Would Do Differently if I Were Diagnosed with Depression Today?

Someone in recovery circles once told me that if you have one foot in the past and another in the future, you are essentially peeing on the present. I try to remember that when I’m engulfed in regret -- obsessing about all the things I did wrong in the past and wishing to God I had made different decisions. However, writing about my mistakes has always been healing for me because I’d like to think this small action could possibly prevent someone else from making the same ones. If I can help a young person or anyone who has recently been diagnosed with depression take a more direct route to healing, it seems irresponsible on my part not to share my detours and missed cues, to keep to myself the information that I now have.
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Addiction

Dialectical Behavior Therapy: For More Than Borderline Personality Disorder

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), developed by Marsha Linehan in the late 1980’s is a specific type of cognitive behavioral therapy that was originally developed to treat chronically suicidal individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD).  It is now considered the treatment of choice for individuals with characteristics associated with symptoms of BPD such as impulsivity, interpersonal problems, emotion dysregulation, self-harm, and chronic suicidal behaviors.
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Anxiety and Panic

Living with “What If” — Addressing Anxiety

There are many people who don’t know that their hesitations, fears, and even compulsive “musts” throughout the day are actually stemmed in anxiety. Regardless if the anxiety is caused from stress or trauma, the longer anxiety is ignored -- the worse it usually gets.

If your life is plagued by “what if” moments, then it is time to address your quality of life from a mental health standpoint. It is important to know that not all anxiety disorders are the same, however all of them can cause such distress that it interferes with your ability to lead a normal life. The “what ifs” can become immobilizing and then the stress can lead to actual physical disability.
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Men

The Mystery of Men in Therapy Revealed

Why is it that so many men feel more comfortable opening up to a therapist -- essentially a stranger -- than they do their own spouse? Do they trust their therapists more than their wives? The short answer is, no, they don’t. The slightly more complicated answer is that they’re afraid to let the one woman who they’re closest with -- the one woman they've professed to love and protect -- know that they, too, are at times scared, confused and dare I say it…sensitive.
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Addiction

Supplementing the 12-Step Program with Yoga


Author Taylor Hunt is teaching people struggling with addiction a new tool for recovery: Ashtanga Yoga. His charity works with treatment centers, halfway houses, and prisons.

Taylor Hunt recently broke his anonymity and published a gritty memoir of his drug addiction, A Way from Darkness. The way out, he found, was the 12-step program coupled with Ashtanga Yoga -- a dynamic series of physical poses and breath work -- which he now teaches at the center he founded in Columbus, Ohio and around the world.

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ADHD and ADD

ADHD and Adults: How to Create a Routine When You Don’t Have a 9 to 5

Maybe you’re an entrepreneur. Maybe you’re a real estate agent or writer. Maybe you’re an artist or a photographer. Maybe you’re a graphic or web designer. Maybe you’re a coach or consultant. Maybe you’re an attorney with your own practice.

Whatever your profession, you aren’t tied to a desk and you don’t have specific work hours -- like 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. And you also have ADHD, which makes not having a built-in structure challenging.
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Addiction

Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Continues to Fail: How Many Kids Must Die Before We Change?

As I write this article I am disgusted, feel responsible and I am ashamed to be a part of an industry that continues to flourish in spite of continued failure. I reflect on 20 years of being around the drug and alcohol rehabilitation industry and I am appalled how little we do to change an industry that 1) Lives on repeat business; 2) Denies a 95% failure rate; and 3) Takes credit for the 5% success rate but blames the addict for the 95% failure rate.
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