Anger

7 Positive Ways to Respond When Someone Steals Credit for Your Work

You’re sitting in a meeting and a co-worker takes credit for your idea. Or maybe you stay late to finish a project, but your name is left off of the final presentation. Your boss grabs the limelight and accepts all the praise.

Even if you work in a company that encourages collaboration, some people still go too far and inappropriately monopolize work as their own, never crediting others.

It’s infuriating when someone blatantly rips off your ideas. It feels wrong. Unfair. You want justice and may even feel a little victimized.
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Habits

15 Tips to Help You Make the Most Important Decisions

Decision-making doesn’t always come easy. For me, it took many years and a great deal of practice to feel comfortable and confident of the choices I’ve made and acted upon. In that time, through trial and error, some suggestions from productive friends, reading a lot and effective therapy to combat anxiety and depression, I’ve come up with the following list of 15 tips that work well for me. Maybe they’ll help you as well.
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General

Are You Keeping Busy to Avoid Your Feelings?

Something really upsetting happened yesterday. But you have too much to do to think about it.

In fact, it always seems like you have too much to do. Naturally, you refocus on your to-do list. Maybe you even add another seemingly necessary commitment. After all, that networking event is important.

So is the charity function. So is coaching your friend’s summer soccer league. So is helping to plan your colleague’s retirement party. So is that speaking gig and writing an article for that newsletter. So is baking cookies for your book club. So is working an hour later on most days.

In the midst of all of this, you also decide to start a new project. You’ve been thinking about it for a while, and now seems like a good time.
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General

How One Therapist Sets Meaningful, Compassionate Goals

Marriage and family therapist Ashley Thorn got tired of setting resolutions she’d never see through. So she started setting goals around her mental and emotional health instead. Goals that meaningfully contribute to her well-being. Goals that are flexible and compassionate and based on her values.

For instance, in 2016, Thorn’s goal was to face her fears. Another year, after moving to a new area and realizing she was in a social rut, she wanted to make more adult friendships. The year after that, she decided to deepen the relationships she already had with longtime friends and family.
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Money and Financial

The Not So Scientific Method

Law degree at 28; blossoming legal career at 35; smiling family at 40.

Or so I thought. Somehow my tickin’ clock overlooked the Great Recession, mind-numbing legal positions, and familial strife.

Entering law school in 2004 (with a forceful push from an overbearing father), I scuffled my way to the bloated middle of the class. While I enjoyed law school’s intellectual challenge, the coursework was drier than your average late-night comedian. And while I formed genuine relationships with law school classmates, our conversations centered on esoteric legal principles and condescending law school professors.
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Family

Seeking Perfection—Even Though We Know It’s Impossible


A teenage boy is an exceptional baseball player. Every time he pitches a perfect game, his parents praise him. Every time he doesn’t, his parents lecture him on what he did wrong (and he berates himself). They encourage him to train long hours.

A young woman is convinced she’s too big. Her mother and grandmother regularly shame others for their weight. And they shame her, too. The young woman’s mom sticks to a strict number of calories and only eats “clean” foods. Soon the young woman starts doing the same. She and her mom “bond” over counting calories. Her mom praises her for adhering to a rigid diet and doing endless cardio. She praises her for losing weight. The young woman is terrified of stopping the diet and exercise.
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ADHD and ADD

Adults with ADHD: How I Overcome My Biggest Challenges to Get Things Done

People with ADHD often see themselves as unproductive, or worse, as lazy and incompetent. Getting things done, especially boring, tedious tasks, may feel impossible, and you might feel utterly demoralized.

But it isn’t that you’re ineffective or inept or hopeless.

The problem really resides in not having the right ADHD-friendly strategies, according to Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical instructor and psychologist who specializes in working with individuals with ADHD and also has ADHD. He suggested adults with ADHD think of themselves as “producers in progress.”
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Depression

Why We Need to Care About the Psychological Toll of Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship carries with it unique pressures unlike any traditional office job.

Starting your own business means you shoulder personal risk, work long hours, and endure more stress than most other workers.

New studies are beginning to shed light on the psychological toll of entrepreneurship. Research shows nearly three-quarters of business owners have concerns about their mental health. Almost half have struggled with
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Best of Our Blogs

How to Stop Taking Yourself So Seriously

“The one serious conviction that a man should have is that nothing is to be taken too seriously.” – Samuel Butler
Do you think of yourself as a serious person? Do you find little to laugh about or is it difficult to let yourself go and enjoy what you’re doing, who you’re with, what you must look forward to tomorrow? There’s a difference between being thoughtful and earnest and being serious. I like to think that seriousness must involve an important situation or problem, not a demeanor I want to portray on an everyday basis. Some might say that I’m too easygoing, but that’s not it, either. I simply want to take life as it comes, do the best I can, and be hopeful and positive in the process.
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