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Anxiety and Panic

Challenging the Stigma of Counselors with Mental Illness

My small Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum class gets out twelve minutes early. I strain to catch the eye of my classmate and friend on the other side of the room, a tall Indian woman with her hair in a sagging bob and sympathetic eyes locked on another classmate. I turn impatiently towards our classmate, who favors red lipstick and dramatic retellings of her life events.
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General

Free Live Webinar: Leading People to Accept the Facts

Seemingly reasonable people deny reality all the time. Indeed, a four-year study by LeadershipIQ.com found that 23 percent of CEOs who got fired did so because they denied reality, meaning refusing to recognize negative facts about the organization’s performance. Other findings show that professionals at all levels suffer from the tendency to deny uncomfortable facts in professional settings.

People deny reality in relationships, politics, and other areas all the time, something that scholars term the "ostrich effect." Dealing with truth denialism -- in business, politics, and other life areas -- is one of the presenter's areas of research, and the topic of his recently-published The Truth-Seeker’s Handbook: A Science-Based Guide. One of the strategies described there can be summarized under the acronym EGRIP (Emotions, Goals, Rapport, Information, Positive Reinforcement), which provides clear guidelines on how to deal with colleagues who deny the facts, and the presenter will describe EGRIP in this webinar.

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General

Podcast: Rachel Star: Stunt Girl, Schizophrenia Advocate


In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales welcome as their guest, Rachel Star, a stunt girl and YouTube sensation who lives with schizophrenia. Rachel had schizophrenia as a child but was not diagnosed until her early twenties. She describes what it was like as a child and the moment she realized that the things she saw weren’t seen by others. Later in life, as an early adopter of online media, she began posting videos of herself doing outlandish things. The videos became quite popular, even being studied in classes at universities! And yes, she talks about being set on fire.
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Creativity

Coping with Failure and Rejection When You’re a Perfectionist

Any creative person knows that pursuing meaningful work also means climbing aboard an emotional rollercoaster. One moment, you’re on top of the world, stepping out onto a stage, or hitting “publish” on a post. Then a disappointing email or a critical comment about your work sends you plunging into despair.
As a perfectionist with an honor-student complex trying to navigate the real world, I know these feelings very well. Those of us who pride ourselves on being goal-oriented can get so emotionally wrapped up in success that the results of our efforts start to dictate our happiness. We begin to over-identify with achievement.
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College

Doing Poorly at School? Failure Isn’t the End of the Road

For most of us, we’ve been told to get good grades and we’ll be successful in life. As a result, we become stressed when exams roll around. For some of us, we have failed exams and maybe even courses. Does failure at school mean we will also fail in life?

As someone currently in university, I feel the pressure of doing well. By well, I mean passing my remaining courses so I can graduate with the credits I need. Some people might think this is rather low standards but, for me, getting through all the courses will be a sense of accomplishment given what I experienced so far in life.
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Happiness

How to Win Even When You Fail

What do the premier designer Vera Wang, the famous 1800s scientist and author of “On the Origin of Species” Charles Darwin, and NPR radio icon Terry Gross have in common? They all failed. And it wasn’t just the trial-and-error, have-to-pay-your-dues kind of failures that most anyone has to endure in order to succeed in any given field. These talented people actually failed to reach their initial dreams, aspirations that were based on entirely different professions than what they are so famously known for!
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Anxiety and Panic

The Damage of Fearing Failure

We are taught from a young age that failure is bad.

Our performance is measured and graded, and we are often defined by our level of success as others perceive it. We are conditioned to fear failure because it is anti-success and therefore downgrades our worth as a person.

Doesn’t it?

The short answer is no, it doesn’t. But the fear of failing can cause a lot of problems.

Fear of failure can be paralyzing. People may turn down new opportunities and opt out of everything from a new job to a new relationship because they are too afraid that they will fail. Yet failing can often be a blessing in disguise. And it is very often the precursor to amazing success and breakthroughs. So why is it so hard to see failure as an acceptable risk?
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Aging

Surprising Losses that Need to Be Grieved

We think that the only time we grieve is when a loved one passes away. But it’s important to grieve all sorts of losses. Moving. Graduating. Retiring. Ending a relationship (even if you’re the one who ended it). Being diagnosed with an illness. Recovering from that illness. Starting a new job or even being promoted.

In short, a loss can be anything, negative or positive. As marriage and family therapist Cheryl Beatrice said, “If we can be connected to it -- whatever ‘it’ is -- then we can grieve its loss.”
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Brain and Behavior

Timing Is Everything: How to Produce Your Best Work

Producing high-quality work day after day is no small feat. When you use your brain on perpetual overdrive, you’re bound to hit productivity slumps where it feels like you’re fresh out of new ideas.
While there’s no shortage of tricks and tips to hack your way to more innovative thinking, timing is everything, says sleep doctor Dr. Micheal Breus, author of The Power of When. He believes working in sync with our body’s natural clock is the key to unlocking success to produce our best, most creative work.
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General

Why We Sabotage Ourselves

Counseling psychologist Rosy Saenz-Sierzega, Ph.D, was working with a client who yearned to find a better job. But he wouldn’t apply for any job until his resume was ready.

The problem? It was taking him months to “perfect” it.

In reality, he was sabotaging his success, ensuring he’d stay stuck at his current company.

Sometimes, we sabotage ourselves by setting unrealistic expectations. We decide to try something when we can do it perfectly—which means we don’t do anything at all. We stay in the dead-end job. We stay in the toxic relationship. We don’t finish the degree.
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Publishers

Which of These Intoxicating Distractions Keep You from Taking Care of Yourself?


We all get 'drunk' on something...

During a recent visit to my son's college campus and the local bar, I had a flash of awareness as I watched many people drink over a few hours span of time.

It was Family Weekend, so there were lots of parents there with their kids (actually adult-age kids) enjoying the carefree college life, laughing, drinking, playing games and having fun. What struck me was how, almost universally, people went from clear-headed communicators to making less and less sense as the day progressed.

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