Anxiety and Panic

Coping with Anxiety in School and the Workplace

Anxiety can affect anyone at any stage in their life, but it is one of the most common mental disorders on college campuses. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, forty million American adults suffer from an anxiety disorder, and 75% of those people have reported that their first anxiety episode occurred by the time they were twenty two.

Are you among them? Many of us who suffer from anxiety avoid seeking direct help. The stigma attached to the disorder is too strong, or maybe it's just too embarrassing to open up about it. If you're on a college campus, there will always be someone in student services who can listen and help. If you're not ready for that right now, or are out in the work world, consider these other options.
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ADHD and ADD

Have ADHD? Designing an Environment That Ignites Your Attention

When you have ADHD, it can feel like anything and everything hampers your focus. Everything is big and blinding. Everything is distracting. The TV. The slightest sound. The silence. Social media. Your coworkers. Your computer. Your dog.

It can feel like anything and everything is messing with your ability to get stuff done, whether you’re at work, at school or at home. And you need to get this stuff done. Which only adds to your already through-the-roof frustration.
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College

How to Say No When Someone Asks to “Pick Your Brain”


When you’re an expert in any field, people may regularly ask to “pick your brain,” buy you lunch or some other form of asking for advice. For free, of course.

If you feel conflicted at time like these, it makes perfect sense. Your schedule is packed, yet your instinct might still be to jump in and help. In fact, your generosity and desire to make a difference likely played a huge part in you going into business to begin with.
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Children and Teens

Why Teens Need a Strict Parent

Being strict is easy when it applies to other people’s kids.

We hear a kid whining in the toy aisle and the mom caves, handing him the toy. You listen to the neighbors complain about their daughter’s defiance of their rules. The nightly news shows the faces of teens who committed a crime and now have a record. “Well, their parents should have been more strict! Strict parents wouldn’t have allowed that. You have to teach and control your children!”
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Friends

How to Manage Your Friends (Without Making It Awkward)

When you’re a fast-rising millennial stepping into a managerial role for the first time, there’s certainly a lot to think about. You’ve probably wondered if your older colleagues will consider you experienced enough.
Or maybe you’ve thought about how the shift in responsibility will affect your work-life balance.
But many new managers have a worry that’s seldom addressed, even though it’s widespread: how to navigate managing peers and friends.
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Children and Teens

The Importance of ’13 Reasons Why’ and It’s Reflection of Teen Mental Health

Warning: This article does include spoilers for the Netflix series "13 Reasons Why".

On March 31, 2017 Netflix released a new series titled, “13 Reasons Why”, based off the book by author Jay Asher. This series depicts a young man, Clay Jensen, and his journey to bring justice for his friend Hannah Baker. Hannah, a seventeen-year-old high school junior with nothing but the future before her, took her life on a seemingly calm afternoon. Why is this important? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that in individuals between the ages of 10 and 24 years old, suicide is the third leading cause of death.
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Brain and Behavior

Decision Fatigue: Does it Help to Wear the Same Clothes Every Day?

Ever since the late Steve Jobs popularized the idea, some folks have been enamored by the idea that by wearing the same clothes everyday, you are somehow setting yourself up for greater success. The psychological reasoning behind this is the idea that the fewer decisions you have to make every day on rudimentary tasks (like choosing your clothing, what you're going to eat, etc.), the more brain power you have available for more important decisions.

But is that true? Does cutting out simple decisions about clothing really likely to significantly impact your overall brain reserve for the day?

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Bullying

Bullying, Incognito: Deliberate Social Exclusion

When we think of bullying, a picture of aggression is typically conjured -- the taunting, name-calling, and physical abuse. Beyond the playground in the adult world, however, bullying often takes place masked in more insidious forms. Deliberate social exclusion can manifest in many ways across situations, occurring in the context of university, work, or within a group if people not connected by their field of study or job.
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College

How to Do Well in College, From a Professor’s Perspective

I’ve taught at colleges and universities in the United States since 1985. I teach writing. And over the years, I’ve amassed a great deal of information on how to teach.  In short, each semester I practice educating others, I become a better instructor. But I’ve also collected some good info on how to get the most out of the college experience from the other side of the “fence” -- how to be a good student and how to enjoy, not just suffer through, college.
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