ADHD and ADD

Special Needs Parents: Taking It Day by Day

Most parents of special needs children are concerned about their kids’ distant future. What about college? Will they be employable? What will they do for the long haul? Will they find someone to love? Will they have a family? Who will take care of them when I’m gone?  

I, on the other hand, live day to day. I don’t worry about ten, twenty or thirty years from now. I’m so engrossed in the moment -- basic survival -- that I don’t project our lives into the future.

There are a few reasons for this.
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Children and Teens

You Can Be Their Parent — And Their Friend

Many of us have heard (or even said) the old line we heard when we were kids: “I’m your parent, not your friend.”

Kristina Kuzmic’s popular vlog on the subject -- “I'm not your friend, kid! (Because I love you.)” – clearly strikes a chord. It has been viewed nearly a million times. In it she says “All three of my kids are mad at me right now … and you know what? I don’t care. … You know why? Because I am not their buddy. I am their parent.”

Although we might mean well when we express this sentiment, our children unfortunately can hear an unintended message that is quite negative. Here are three things to consider before saying, “I’m your parent, not your friend,” to the kids again.
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Money and Financial

The Not So Scientific Method

Law degree at 28; blossoming legal career at 35; smiling family at 40.

Or so I thought. Somehow my tickin’ clock overlooked the Great Recession, mind-numbing legal positions, and familial strife.

Entering law school in 2004 (with a forceful push from an overbearing father), I scuffled my way to the bloated middle of the class. While I enjoyed law school’s intellectual challenge, the coursework was drier than your average late-night comedian. And while I formed genuine relationships with law school classmates, our conversations centered on esoteric legal principles and condescending law school professors.
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Children and Teens

Growing Up Too Fast: Early Exposure to Sex

Children are naturally exploratory beings. As we develop, we engage with the world around us using all our senses. Imagine yourself at 2 or 3, crawling around in a grassy field on a summer day. You feel the warmth of the sun on your skin, the gentle breeze blowing through your hair, you breathe in the aroma of the fresh green grass, perhaps even pluck a piece and sample it. A puddle from a recent rain storm beckons you and you splash about in it, drenching yourself. An ice cream cone is offered to you and you savor the sweetness and stickiness as it drips down your chin and onto your clothes.
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Anxiety and Panic

Is Your Worry Normal or a Sign of an Anxiety Disorder?

You worry about passing your exam and surviving your presentation. You worry about making a mistake at work. You worry about not having enough money to pay this month’s bills. You worry about the email you just sent, which misspelled your new coworker’s name. Ughhh.

Some days, it feels like you worry for breakfast, lunch and dinner (with a few snacks in between). Lately, you’ve been wondering if your worry is actually normal. You’ve been wondering, am I worrying too much?  
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Habits

How to Recognize and Foster Your Ability

“Ability and necessity dwell near each other.” – Pythagoras
What are you good at? If you must stop and think about it, that’s not a dreadful thing. In fact, it’s probably long overdue. The truth is that we get so busy living life and taking care of all the myriad tasks and responsibilities we need to tend to every day that we often don’t take the time to slow down and reflect. In this case, reflect on what we do very well, what really
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ADHD and ADD

I Chose Not to Medicate My ADHD — Here’s Why

A white room.

The day I was diagnosed, they brought me into a (not kidding) white room with a metal table. There was a machine at the head of the table. The machine kind of reminded me of a shrunken MRI scanner, but I didn’t have much of a chance to study it.  

I laid down, and they put wires all over my head and my chest. The wires were gooey (“How am I going to get that out of my hair?”). Mom had kept me awake for most of the night, so when they told me to go to sleep, and I was out like a light. I was eight years old.
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Aspergers

Special Needs

My autistic son has had dozens of doctors, therapists, intervention specialists, teachers, aids, coaches and camp counselors, and most of these individuals and their programs have been very helpful for Tommy. Nine years of special attention have been good for him. He went from an anxious child with behavior problems, with average grades to a more confident 12-year-old who won the citizenship prize at school, with straight As and an Honor Roll certificate.
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Anxiety and Panic

When Your Kid Is an Athlete and a Perfectionist

Joe loved playing soccer and if he had a choice, he would spend all his waking hours playing the sport. He was also a high achiever in other areas of his life. He was proud of the A’s he received in all his classes. He was multi-talented and his parents were pleased with his efforts. However, by the time he entered 10th grade, his parents noticed he had started to become highly critical of himself whenever his team lost. It was difficult for him to get over his own mistakes. He’d punish himself by increasing his practice time and avoid hanging out with his friends.
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Anxiety and Panic

The Reality of Preschool Anxiety Disorders

Most people think that younger children can't have anxiety. They think that because children do not have much of a life experience, what do they have to be anxious about? The truth is very different. Almost 20% of pre-schoolers (aged 3 to 4) have an anxiety condition. Anxiety can be linked with depression and problems with behavior and sleeping. Due to this, it is important to treat the condition as early as possible. A study published in the 'Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology' explores diagnosis of anxiety in pre-schoolers using structured interviews. This included both the pre-schoolers and their parents. The authors, led by Lea Dougherty from University of Maryland College Park, looked at whether there was an anxiety disorder or not and then they looked at what other thinks might be linked to there being a diagnosis of anxiety.
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