Happiness

Psychology Around the Net: December 31, 2016


Happy New Year, sweet readers!

For a variety of understandable reasons, I know many of you are glad to see 2016 end.

The other night, I was talking (ranting) to my beau about how horrible this year has been and how I can't wait for it to end because it just can't get any worse when -- BOOM! -- common sense knocked me right upside the noggin mid-sentence.

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Children and Teens

The Most Pressing Reason Why We Need to Help Our Kids Get Moving

A headline crossed my desktop recently. And it made me sad: 

“U.S. ranks near bottom among countries for youth fitness, study says”

We’d ranked 47 out of 50.

It didn’t concern me that we’d be among the losers in a global field day. After all, the pressure to always win, rather than to have fun, is a key reason why most kids in the U.S. drop out of organized sports by the time they’re 
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Aging

Psychology Around the Net: December 24, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

I celebrate Christmas, which means today -- Christmas Eve -- I'm surrounded by friends and family and fortunately an extremely low number of gifts (our families decided to focus on the children this year, much to my delight). Over the years, I've become more and more aware of -- and sad to the point of sobbing about -- how our society has turned Christmas into a gluttonous commercial nightmare. To me, the holidays aren't...
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Addiction

Why Do We Become So Addicted to Sugar?


Addiction is a medical condition in which the person has uncontrollable desire to take a substance or engage in an activity, despite knowing that it may lead to adverse effects. Taking that substance or engaging in that activity will make the person feel good. Does sugar fit the bill? Clearly yes, as so many of us cannot control cravings for something sweet.

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Brain and Behavior

Psychology Around the Net: December 10, 2016


My neck of the woods had its first snow yesterday! It wasn't anything major -- just some steady flurries, really -- but it lasted several hours and made me happy. I love the first snow of the season; it's just...magical to me. It always puts me in a good mood.

According to the forecast, it won't snow any this weekend, but at least I got to enjoy it yesterday.

Anyway, off to this week's mental health news! Get ready for how the 21st Century Cures Act will affect mental health care, a list of essential habits to help boost your everyday life, how training teachers in mental health could help students, and more.

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Brain Blogger

How Obesity Affects the Human Brain


The number of overweight and obese people (those with BMI above 25) around the world is approaching the two billion mark. This is more than 20% of estimated 7.4 billion people currently populating the planet. The connection between obesity and various chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some types of cancer is well established. Not much, however, is known about how the excess body weight influences the structure and function of brain.

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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

Psychology Around the Net: December 3, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

It's pretty dark and rainy in my neck of the woods today, which doesn't give me much Christmas spirit (I'm finally decorating today...or hoping to, anyway); however, such weather does do a little something interesting for my overall spirit.

Have you ever heard the term "pluviophile"? Basically, a pluviophile (a term that derives from "pluvial," meaning "of or relating to rain") is someone who -- you guessed it -- can find joy and peace of mind during rainy days.

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Antidepressant

Could an Antidepressant Prevent Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury?


The prevalence and functional effects of depressive disorder following traumatic brain injury are significant. Now, sertraline may be effective for preventing depressive symptoms after TBI.

A group of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine evaluated 94 patients aged 18 to 85 years who had been hospitalized for mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most of the patients (n=92) were Caucasian and more than half (n=56) were male. The research team randomized the patients to receive either 100 mg daily of sertraline (48 patients) or placebo (46 patients) for 24 weeks or until symptoms of a mood disorder occurred.

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Anger

Psychology Around the Net: November 26, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

Also, Happy Belated Thanksgiving to my fellow Americans!

I hope each and every one of you had a day (or, are still have a few days!) of time spent with your loved ones appreciating all the blessings in your life -- and, if you don't already, I hope you spend some time to do that every day.

This week's Psychology Around the Net takes a look at the latest on sexism related to men's mental health, the stigma of mental illness in the hip-hop community, how creativity benefits or hampers emotional wellbeing, and more.

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