Bipolar

Psychology Around the Net: January 28, 2017


As you read this, I'm hanging with friends in a cabin snuggled in the middle of snow-covered mountains, and I don't feel one bit of guilt about it.

Last week, I mentioned I was extremely busy with a work project. I was scrambling to finish the work (and still provide quality results) because it'd gone on too long. The project was a bigger beast than I'd anticipated, and it took three weeks longer to complete than I estimated.

So, for roughly three weeks, I stayed glued to my laptop, which physically and mentally drained me. I didn't workout, I didn't go out with friends, and because of this perceived "lack of time," my diet (i.e. the foods I ate) started to suffer.

However, I didn't take any steps to change anything -- to take any time for myself outside of showering and going to bed -- because I didn't want to feel guilty.

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Addiction

Does Tough Love Lead to Wellness? A Glimpse into One Family’s Experience with Addiction

Heroin abuse in the United States is reaching epidemic proportions. According to SAMHSA, between 2007 and 2012, the number of heroin users has doubled from an estimated 375,000 to over 665,000. Additionally, in 2010, the number of deaths as a direct result of overdose surpassed auto accident deaths.  

It is impossible to avoid the facts about heroin. We are bombarded daily by the national and local media and extensive online resources. So, is tough love the answer?
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Addiction

Addiction: Accepting the Treatment Norm Is Not an Option

For over fifty years the treatment industry has categorically failed. Personal experience of this writer as well as objective data has demonstrated that 3-5% of individuals who complete residential treatment will remain “sober” for a year or more. Additionally, according to the Baldwin Research Institute Inc., over 90% of all treatment in the U.S. is 12-step based and over 95% teach the disease concept. From any perspective and surely from a business perspective, a 95% failure rate is utterly unacceptable. Why does society and the medical/clinical community accept these findings? The answer seems to be “this is how we have always done it.”
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Brain Blogger

The Science of Preventing Dangerous Psychopathy


What makes someone a psychopath? Nature or nurture? And can we stop at risk children from growing up into dangerous adult psychopaths? One of the oldest queries in psychology -- nature versus nurture -- asks if what makes us who we are is predisposed by our DNA, or by life experiences. It is a pretty poignant question when it comes to psychopaths, who are estimated to account for up to 50% of all serious crimes in the US.

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Alzheimer

Psychology Around the Net: January 21, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

Finally, the weekend is here. That doesn't mean too much to me, however, considering how busy I am with work -- wait. I'm not supposed to say that because...

...today's Psychology Around the Net takes a look at how creativity is born, some not-so-common habits to improve your life, and -- yes -- why saying things like "I'm so busy" might actually be a mindset more than a reality.

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Brain and Behavior

Trying to Lose Weight? Maybe You Should Ditch That New Wearable

Wearable technology -- those gadgets people wear around their wrist to track their heart rate or number of steps walked or run -- is all the rage. This sort of personal data tracking is especially popular among younger people and those who exercise regularly. Whether it's a Fitbit, Nike+ Fuelband, a Garmin Vivofit, or some other fitness tracker, people love the ability to easily track their progress over time.

But if you're wearing one of these devices while trying to lose weight, you may find it surprising that wearable technology likely won't help you -- and could even hurt (a little) in your weight-loss journey.

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College

Psychology Around the Net: January 14, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

Did everyone make it through yesterday relatively unscathed?

I ran into an interesting article regarding Friday the 13th and the cultural- and psychological-based reasons for superstition. Even if you don't pay attention to superstitions and didn't even know yesterday was the dreaded Friday the 13th, Why Do We Fear Friday the 13th? is an interesting look at how we react to things we can't control, as well as how we try to control them.

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Anxiety and Panic

The Number One Mistake in Dealing with Rejection

This is Part Two in a series on Overcoming Rejection. Read Part One here: Overcoming Rejection: 5 Inspiring Lessons from Famous Women.
Tell me if any of this sounds familiar. You’re being criticized by friends, family, or coworkers. You try to defend yourself but you end up feeling embarrassed, angry, or some other negative emotion. Most importantly, this situation happened days ago and you’ve been reliving it in your mind ever since. If this describes you, then you have done post-event processing, which can be one of the most harmful reactions to rejection.
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General

PODCAST: What Does the 21st Century Cures Act Mean For the Mentally Ill?

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe and Vincent welcome mental health researcher and Psych Central Founder, Dr. John Grohol, to discuss the newly passed 21st Century Cures Act. In addition to other bills, the Act integrated parts of what was previously known as The Murphy Bill or Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act. There has been a lot of talk in the mental health community about how, exactly, the news laws will help people living with mental illness.

Listen as Dr. Grohol explains what impact this law will have on treating mental illness in America. He also explains, in layman’s terms, the details of the new law and offers his expert analysis of how the new laws will affect HIPAA regulations, assisted outpatient treatment, research, and SAMHSA.

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Celebrities

Overcoming Rejection: 5 Inspiring Lessons from Famous Women

Whether you have social anxiety, panic disorder, depression, or just plain dislike criticism, rejection stings. If you’ve faced rejection recently, you’re in good company. Here are lessons drawn from history from five unforgettable and famous women: The world’s bestselling author, a Nobel Prize Laureate, a first lady, a wildly popular talk show host, and a social advocate who overcame dual disabilities.
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