Caregivers

Pediatric OCD and Its Effects on Family

A study published in the March 17, 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry concludes that pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder negatively affects not only the children who suffer from it, but also their parents.

At the risk of sounding snarky, anyone who has a child with OCD could've told you that.

Still, well-conducted studies, as opposed to anecdotal evidence, are important. If nothing else, they give clinicians and researchers concrete information to reference, study and build upon in their quest to understand OCD and how to best help those whose lives are affected by it.
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Aging

Psychology Around the Net: July 22, 2017


Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers!

Confession time: I've been struggling a lot lately with work-life balance. Hasn't everyone at some point? Probably. Trying to manage work responsibilities, exercise, some semblance of a social life, personal hobbies and passions--oh, and let's not forget a proper sleep schedule--whew. Failing--and failing for longer than you care to admit--can bring on the panic, anxiety, and depression in a major way.

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Memory and Perception

Brain Inflammation and OCD


A very interesting study was recently published in JAMA Psychiatry stating that brain inflammation in those with obsessive-compulsive disorder is significantly elevated (by more than 30 percent) compared to those without the disorder.

Dr. Jeffrey Meyer, senior author of the study and Head of the Neuroimaging Program in Mood & Anxiety at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, says:1
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Psychology

Can Computer-Based Intervention Benefit Our Stress Levels?

Too much stress is a problem we all face, however stress isn’t always a bad thing. Sometimes, feeling stressed can lead to more motivation and greater focus. If we overdo it, however, it can have a bad impact on our mental health. This can range from having a short temper, to headaches, to having trouble sleeping, to even becoming unwell.

According to the APA, 75 percent of adults will go through some stress on any given month. In spite of how many people is affected by stress only a few of them will get any help. This may be due to lack of time, worrying about what others may think, thinking we should be able to get over it on our own or simply not being able to afford help. A way to make accessing help more convenient, more private and cheaper is through digital technology, but can web-based treatments really help?
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Depression

The Depressive Realism Hypothesis: Yay or Nay?


Fascinating.

Are you suffering from depression? You may not be so proud of your melancholy state of being, but there is a bright side to the situation.

If you are constantly looking at the glass as half empty, and wondering what the point of life is, you may be thinking more realistically than those nauseously joyous folks you see skipping around Happy Hour.

It turns out, that depressed people see the world more realistically and may be judging their own performance and the state of reality in a more realistic way.

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Alcoholism

Psychology Around the Net: July 8, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

I hope you're all having a great weekend (or whatever day you're reading this!), but you definitely want to take a few minutes to check out this week's Psychology Around the Net which tells us more about canine compulsion disorder (and how learning about it helps us also learn about human obsessive-compulsive disorder), the emotional intelligence behind internet trolls, how to deal with friends who always bail, and more.

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Anxiety and Panic

Cinematherapy: The Healing Power of Movies and TV

A picture may very well be worth a thousand words. A motion picture? Maybe even more than that.

In a March 2016 article for Counseling Today, Bronwyn Robertson, a counselor and member of the American Counseling Association, writes: 1
Barely able to breathe, a young man battling a panic attack hesitantly enters the group room and makes his way to an empty chair. He and a dozen others “check in” and are then guided through a simple, calming breathing exercise. The lights are...
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Anxiety and Panic

Psychology Around the Net: July 1, 2017


I'm super pumped, friends. This weekend, I'll be traveling to a city I've never visited to see a band I've never seen live (and never thought I would).

I love going to concerts. I go to multiple shows each year and I thrive on the anticipation before the show, the energy during the show, and the sense of "I just experienced something truly amazing" after the show, and guess what? All these concerts are benefiting the crap out of my mental health. Specifically, they reduce stress and boost my spirits, provide a sense of connection with the community (especially when it's a local concert), helps me reflect on life.

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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

10 Summer Depression Busters

Although my mood seems to be better with more sun, I understand why a substantial number of folks get more depressed in the summer. Extreme heat is hard to tolerate. In fact, in a study published in Science in 2013, researchers reported that as temperatures rose, the frequency of interpersonal violence increased by 4 percent, and intergroup conflicts by 14 percent.
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Creativity

Psychology Around the Net: June 24, 2017


I conquered a fear last weekend, y'all. I went whitewater rafting for the first time. It wasn't a phobia, but the days -- and especially hours -- leading up to it...well, I was terrified. What if I fall out of the raft? Crack my skull? Get sucked into one of those underwater cave things under some rocks?

Fortunately, none of those things happened, and I'm chalking it up to two factors: One, I gave in and trusted my friends (and especially our guide), and two, I gave in and trusted myself. We couldn't control the whitewater, but we could control ourselves, and we did.

Fear and trust make for interesting bedfellows, don't they?

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