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General

What is Motor-Mouth Syndrome?

"Motor-Mouth Syndrome" is when you or someone involved in a “supposed” conversation cannot stop talking to the point that the other person has great difficulty getting any words into the conversation. The conversation is one sided, as a result.

Motor-Mouths come in many versions but all do the same (incessantly talk and Hi-jack the conversation). Some are:

1. The Kind “Motor-Mouth”
You bump into this person, he or she asks, “How are you?,” appearing like they are really interested in you. Once you give your short answer they immediately take the “ball” from you and never ever give it back to you. They incessantly talk about themselves and their interests.

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Anger

Psychology Around the Net: September 23, 2017


Don't let the picture fool you! If you're dealing with depression, you might want to cut back on counting sheep and take a look at what sleep deprivation can do to help your moods (says some research).

Also, keep going for a look at how psychology training might benefit entrepreneurs more than business training, why getting angry every now and then is a good thing, the psychology behind paying so much money for an iPhone (or any product you don't expect to cost that much), and more.

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Depression

Seasonal Affective Disorder: The Silent Season

It's that time again. The days are getting shorter and the air is getting colder. The leaves are beginning to change colors and delicately fall. We pull out our scarves and gloves and drink warm cider. To many, the change in season is received with a warm welcome and open arms. To others, they begin to settle into the knowledge that their least favorite season is among them.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that emerges during autumn and well through the winter months. Some commonly mistake SAD with the general feeling of laziness during the winter months as symptoms tend to include increased sleep, withdrawal from people and feeling chronically fatigued. SAD is not an a symptom of disliking winter and not to be confused with major depressive disorder -- but rather a specific type of depression that comes around seasonally.
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Anxiety and Panic

Bad Bosses: 3 Ways to Spot the Codependent

Your mental health and your physical health are at risk, if you work for a codependent boss. How do you spot one?

After all, you know how to spy a narcissistic boss. They’re divas enthralled by their own voices, clamoring for the adoration of crowds, and surrounded by folks they regard as their minions who must avoid their spotlight or get the chop. As the movie Dirty Dancing almost said, “Nobody puts the narcissist in the corner.” Other ways to spot a narcissistic boss include: they hate being interrupted; detest being disagreed with; and when they joke, you’d better laugh. Narcissists can be charming at first. But similar to leaving cheese languishing in the sun -- after a while, they can get up your nose. Narcissistic bosses and codependent bosses are quite different.
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Anxiety and Panic

Should You Take that Job? 5 Signs Your Gut Says ‘No’

Most of the choices we make every day are simple and straight-forward: what to wear to work, what to eat for lunch, whether to go to sleep at a reasonable hour or stay up watching Netflix. They don’t cause much stress or inner conflict.

Career transition points, on the other hand, can leave you feeling significantly more stuck -- especially when you’re facing a big, life-changing decisions.
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General

Mental Health & the Psychology of Surviving a Hurricane

Having lived through my second hurricane in Florida (Hurricane Andrew was my first), I have some ideas about what makes the experience less stressful for those who are stuck in place. While I can't begin to imagine the devastation experienced by many people living in the Florida Keys and many of the Caribbean islands, I think there are some things you can do that will help your mental health and stress levels.

The most important thing is your physical safety and that of your loved ones. But after you've accounted for everyone's physical well-being, your psychological and emotional safety are equally important. Here's how psychologically to survive a hurricane.

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Creativity

How to Become a More Interesting Person

Many people see themselves as boring or not very interesting. As a result, they minimize social contact, or feel self-conscious and awkward when interacting.

Having a self-image of being uninteresting can lead to isolation and loneliness, while eroding self-worth.

A fascinating inquiry is to explore what makes us interesting. Is it our net worth, our accomplishments, or knowing people who are popular? Maybe these factors create a curious image that some people find appealing. But do we want people to find our image interesting or find us interesting?

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Brain and Behavior

You Can Train Your Brain to Be More Positive with These Steps

The clients I work with tend to have a few things in common: they are smart, ambitious, and highly motivated. Most of them are also stressed to the max.

From the outside, they appear powerful and poised. But on the inside, they worry about their ability to deal with the demands that come along with having a successful career.

If you’re a top-performer, you can probably relate. In fact,
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Addiction

To Everything There Is a Season: Can Time of Year Impact Our Perspective on Death?

Recently I was speaking with a couple whose adult son died two months ago of a drug overdose. These parents adored him and knew he was dealing with emotional challenges. They did what they could to let him know he was loved and they were with him come what may. They attempted to get him help. He was surrounded by a multi-generational family who thought the world of him.

As we processed their experience and they openly shared their grief, they said something that in all my years as a therapist, I had not considered. They both acknowledged that as we approached the threshold between summer and autumn, they were experiencing a heightened sense of loss.
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General

A Powerful Exercise for Moving Past Regret

You stayed in many toxic relationships. Many years too long. You never finished college. You left a really good job for a job you now can’t stand. You had countless embarrassing, neglectful drunken moments, which ultimately led to your divorce. You filed for bankruptcy. You racked up thousands upon thousands of dollars in student loans. You threw yourself into work while a loved one was dying. You pursued the profession your parents demanded. You didn’t say what you wanted to say. You didn’t trust yourself.

And you regret it. And you keep thinking about these regrets—these bad moments, these bad decisions—over and over and over. You play out various scenarios. You play out different decisions you could’ve made.
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