General

Can a President Have a Mental Illness?

In our tireless fight against stigma, prejudice, and discrimination in order to help people understand that mental illness is no different than a physical disease, where do we draw the line? If we can't discriminate against someone with a mental illness for a job -- like an accountant or soldier -- what are the jobs that require a different yardstick?

Does being President of the United States require a person to have no active mental illness or history of illness? Or is that just another form of discrimination against people with mental illness?

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Brain and Behavior

How to Use Exercise to Overcome Abuse and Bullying and Heal Your Brain

Most therapists, doctors, and mental health professionals recommend exercise to combat depression and anxiety caused by abuse and bullying. However, at no fault of their own, they rarely offer a specific plan. That is because until now it has not been out there. But that has changed recently.

For the first time, we can align exercise routines with mental health issues for recovery. We can align changes to the brain that occur with specific mental health issues with specific movements designed to heal affected brain areas and make people feel better.
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Addiction

Rebuilding Relationships After Rehab

You’ve done it. After years of denial, after suffering many losses (people, jobs, money), you finally looked at your life of addiction and said “Enough.” You went into rehab to quit the addiction and to start a new life. Give yourself enormous credit for that. Making the decision to do it took courage. Staying in the program took commitment and determination.

Now you have to meet the challenge of returning to the life you left. You have made major changes. But chances are that the home you are returning to hasn’t.
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General

3 Reasons You Handed that Life Coach Your Money (And Why that Doesn’t Make You Stupid)

One of humanity’s best traits is the individual’s desire to become their best self. Since way before humanistic psychology labelled this self-actualization, humans have been searching for something higher, something better; their key to happiness. Whether that search was within the realms of spirituality, for a higher understanding, or capitalism, for a higher bank balance, the seekers shared a similar motivation; to become the person that they dreamed of being, their ideal self.
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Anger

Why Are People Mean?

“Friggin jerk!” Cecily screamed at the man in the blue Volvo who swerved too close for comfort. Even though her two young sons were in the car, she raged on, “What are you, a moron? Where did you learn to drive? I hope you rot.”

Cecily wanted help controlling her reactions. She knew instinctively her temper was damaging to her children and contributed to her high blood pressure. When Cecily described her road rage to me, she described herself as being angry with the man in the Blue Volvo. “Of course you were,” I validated, “After all, the driver scared the heck out of you.” But then, I explained to Cecily how she acted out that anger by yelling.
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Bipolar

Psychology Around the Net: January 28, 2017


As you read this, I'm hanging with friends in a cabin snuggled in the middle of snow-covered mountains, and I don't feel one bit of guilt about it.

Last week, I mentioned I was extremely busy with a work project. I was scrambling to finish the work (and still provide quality results) because it'd gone on too long. The project was a bigger beast than I'd anticipated, and it took three weeks longer to complete than I estimated.

So, for roughly three weeks, I stayed glued to my laptop, which physically and mentally drained me. I didn't workout, I didn't go out with friends, and because of this perceived "lack of time," my diet (i.e. the foods I ate) started to suffer.

However, I didn't take any steps to change anything -- to take any time for myself outside of showering and going to bed -- because I didn't want to feel guilty.

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Borderline Personality

Childhood Sexual Abuse: ‘Preparation and Response’ Instead of ‘Prevention’

There is a basic need in our society to change the approach to how we prepare our children for possible sexual assault or abuse. It is wrong for us to teach “sexual assault prevention” to young children, perpetuating this awful suggestion that a small child has ANY capacity whatsoever to prevent his/her own abuse. Instead we need to teach healthy attitudes toward sexuality, and to prepare our children for interactions with “tricky people.”
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Brain Blogger

The Science of Preventing Dangerous Psychopathy


What makes someone a psychopath? Nature or nurture? And can we stop at risk children from growing up into dangerous adult psychopaths? One of the oldest queries in psychology -- nature versus nurture -- asks if what makes us who we are is predisposed by our DNA, or by life experiences. It is a pretty poignant question when it comes to psychopaths, who are estimated to account for up to 50% of all serious crimes in the US.

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Anger

7 Red Flags to Watch Out for in a New Relationship

You’re dating someone new and everything seems to be going pretty well. That is until you spot something a little off in his (or her) behavior. When you’re first getting to know someone, you don’t want to analyze and judge every single thing he does or way he acts, but you also want to evaluate what kind of person he is and if he could be a good fit for you.

When we really like someone, we often want to overlook certain behaviors and chock it up to him or her having a bad day or our reading the situation wrong. But before you get too invested in someone, it’s important to know what her personality is really like. Here are seven red flags to watch out for in a new relationship.
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Addiction

Own Your Faults and Resolve to Mend Them

“How few there are who have courage enough to own their faults, or resolution enough to mend them.” - Benjamin Franklin

Everyone has faults. Some cause only minor harm, while others get in the way of relationships, career, mental health and personal development. The issue isn’t the existence of faults, but how we deal with them.
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