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Children and Teens

Want Happy and Healthy Kids? Just Say “NO!”

When asked what they want for their kids, many parents respond, “I just want them to be happy and healthy.” Such a simple, harmless, laudable goal!

And yet, such an orientation frequently results in parents giving their kids too much stuff, too many experiences, at too early an age. The upshot: These kids become more harpy than happy. Rather than feeling grateful for what they’ve been given, they feel resentful that their every whim is not being satisfied.
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ADHD and ADD

5 Things to Teach Your Child to Avoid Impulsivity & Behavioral Issues

Parenting a child with impulsivity and behavioral issues is one tough task, and in some cases when parents visit me and ask for help, they believe it is impossible to teach their kid to avoid these behaviors. Well, in this article I will be walking you through the things to teach your child in order to avoid impulsivity and bad behaviors.

First off, you have to understand what the cause of these behaviors is. If your kid just can't help it, then he or she may have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or some other condition that is not entirely his or her fault. And as a parent, it is important to know that it is not as a result of bad parenting but caused by a brain-based condition.
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Bullying

Millennial Men, Women and Casual Sex

The term "hookup" has been used widely to describe the romantic and sexual experiences of Millennials.

But according to a recent study conducted by Harvard's Graduate School of Education, Millennials aren't engaging in as much casual sex as we think they are. In fact, this study found that among the 2,000, 18-to-25-year-old heterosexual, cis-gender males from across the U.S. interviewed, the majority reported looking forward to having romantic and long-term relationships. These results can probably put our widespread hook-up culture concerns to rest.

Unfortunately, however, they reveal a different and more disturbing problem.
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Books

Yeah Right — Getting My Teen to Read Would Be a Miracle

It is not unusual to see a teenager with their phone in their hand and their eyes glued to its screen. You may even harbor some concerns that your teen is internet-addicted with the amount of time they spend on their phone. But at least they’re reading something, right?

Well, the research isn’t so sure about that.

Researchers looking at childhood use of smartphones and other devices have found an alarming
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Children and Teens

Life Lessons Children Learn When They’re Not Happy All the Time


You and your child don’t have to agree on everything.

Everybody wants to make their children happy. But trying to make your children happy ALL the time is a bust. Nobody is happy all the time. You don’t want to teach your child that they must feel happy all the time. It’s easy to make that mistake.

You want your child to have all of the things you didn’t have growing up, but this will give them a false sense of security and will backfire.
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Caregivers

Pediatric OCD and Its Effects on Family

A study published in the March 17, 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry concludes that pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder negatively affects not only the children who suffer from it, but also their parents.

At the risk of sounding snarky, anyone who has a child with OCD could've told you that.

Still, well-conducted studies, as opposed to anecdotal evidence, are important. If nothing else, they give clinicians and researchers concrete information to reference, study and build upon in their quest to understand OCD and how to best help those whose lives are affected by it.
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Children and Teens

You Can Be Their Parent — And Their Friend

Many of us have heard (or even said) the old line we heard when we were kids: “I’m your parent, not your friend.”

Kristina Kuzmic’s popular vlog on the subject -- “I'm not your friend, kid! (Because I love you.)” – clearly strikes a chord. It has been viewed nearly a million times. In it she says “All three of my kids are mad at me right now … and you know what? I don’t care. … You know why? Because I am not their buddy. I am their parent.”

Although we might mean well when we express this sentiment, our children unfortunately can hear an unintended message that is quite negative. Here are three things to consider before saying, “I’m your parent, not your friend,” to the kids again.
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Anger

Is Your Partner Jealous of Your Child?

When you met your partner and fell in love you probably dreamed and eventually planned out a life together. For many this plan included the possibility of children. Fast-forward to having one or more children and all is perfect, right? Maybe not.

Life has a way of taking you through unexpected twists and turns and rarely, if ever, does it turn out the way you anticipated. What if one of those unexpected twists however, is your partner’s jealousy of your children?
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Family

The Art of Talking

I met my husband, Steve, in 1994.

We went out to dinner on a blind date. Strangely enough, I had the feeling when I met him that I was going to marry him. We wed three years later. This year we’re celebrating our 20-year wedding anniversary.

Back in 2003, when we were trying to adopt a baby, a social worker told us that we needed to learn how to communicate better with each other. My husband was quiet by nature, and I didn’t want to make him talk if he didn’t want to speak; consequently, a lot went unsaid.
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Children and Teens

Doctor Explains Symptoms of Empathic Children


How to determine if your child is an empath.

Empathic children have nervous systems which react more quickly and strongly to external stimuli including stress.

In The Empath’s Survival Guide, I emphasize that empath children feel too much but don’t know how to manage the sensory overload. They see more, hear more, smell more, intuit more, and experience emotions more.

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Family

Seeking Perfection—Even Though We Know It’s Impossible


A teenage boy is an exceptional baseball player. Every time he pitches a perfect game, his parents praise him. Every time he doesn’t, his parents lecture him on what he did wrong (and he berates himself). They encourage him to train long hours.

A young woman is convinced she’s too big. Her mother and grandmother regularly shame others for their weight. And they shame her, too. The young woman’s mom sticks to a strict number of calories and only eats “clean” foods. Soon the young woman starts doing the same. She and her mom “bond” over counting calories. Her mom praises her for adhering to a rigid diet and doing endless cardio. She praises her for losing weight. The young woman is terrified of stopping the diet and exercise.
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