Anorexia

To the Mother of a Daughter with an Eating Disorder

You remember holding your child, kissing her, cuddling her, whispering, "I love you." You remember her running through the grass, laughing, with a constant smile on her face. You remember what it used to be like before ED (Eating disorder) came into her life.

Writing this I am almost tempted to say that ED is like a really bad boyfriend your daughter has. He’s powerful, manipulating, pervasive, and destructive. He has all the wrong intentions. He doesn’t know when to back off, stop abusing her, or telling her lies.
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Antidepressant

Mothers’ Depression, Not SSRI Use, Best Explains Researchers’ Results

Back in October, researchers published the findings from a study that suggested that mothers who take a common form of antidepressants (SSRIs like Prozac) while pregnant are at greater risk for producing offspring that will later have speech or language problems.

However, this month, the researchers got some push back in the journal where the original study was published. And in reviewing the results of the study, it appears the researchers overstated the association and import of the relationship they found.

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Children and Teens

High Speed Parenting with Teens — A Common Cause of Broken Connections

It’s easy to succumb to instinctive reactions when teens seem irritable, rejecting, and unproductive -- especially when we think we understand what’s going on and what they should be doing. Without knowing how to decode teens behavior, and/ or when emotional factors interfere with perspective, parents are vulnerable to misinterpreting difficult situations based on their own feelings and the literal, often misleading message they perceive from teens. Being in the dark and reacting automatically puts...
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Bipolar

How Does Your Depression Affect Your Child?

Tracy Thompson begins her thoughtful book The Ghost in the House with two brilliant sentences: “Motherhood and depression are two countries with a long common border. The terrain is chilly and inhospitable, and when mothers speak of it at all, it is usually in guarded terms, or in euphemisms.”

If depression happened in a vacuum, it would be so much easier.
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