Bipolar

Psychology Around the Net: January 28, 2017


As you read this, I'm hanging with friends in a cabin snuggled in the middle of snow-covered mountains, and I don't feel one bit of guilt about it.

Last week, I mentioned I was extremely busy with a work project. I was scrambling to finish the work (and still provide quality results) because it'd gone on too long. The project was a bigger beast than I'd anticipated, and it took three weeks longer to complete than I estimated.

So, for roughly three weeks, I stayed glued to my laptop, which physically and mentally drained me. I didn't workout, I didn't go out with friends, and because of this perceived "lack of time," my diet (i.e. the foods I ate) started to suffer.

However, I didn't take any steps to change anything -- to take any time for myself outside of showering and going to bed -- because I didn't want to feel guilty.

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Addiction

After FTC Action, Elimidrol Suddenly a Mood Enhancement Supplement

I've long been skeptical of the dozens of nutritional supplements on the market that claim to "enhance your mood" or promote a healthy "emotional balance." A healthy emotional balance comes from learning specific psychological skills in life to help you better cope with and benefit from your emotions -- not from a pill.

So I found it more than a little bit strange when I was recently contacted by a marketing company promoting a "mood enhancing" supplement called Elimidrol. This supplement was marketed for over 2 1/2 years -- with apparently little or no scientific evidence -- by Sunrise Nutraceuticals as an effective remedy for opiate withdrawal.

How did this supplement make an apparent 180 degree marketing turn from helping to relieve opiate withdrawal to mood enhancer so readily?

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Habits

4 Tips to Improve Your Self-Care

Self-care is one of those things that for one reason or another we tend to put off and ignore. Self-care is a crucial part of human functioning that provides us with the tools needed to face our daily challenges. In treatment, self-care almost always gets assessed initially, as it tends to be a driven force in recovery. However, I have noticed that this term has been commonly misinterpreted for selfishness and self-indulgence. It’s important to consider what self-care in the mental health field refers to and why it’s important to implement it in your lifestyle the most effective way. 
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Children and Teens

Outrage Over Katelyn Nicole Davis Video Suicide Misses the Point

At the close of 2016, 12-year-old Katelyn Nicole Davis decided that she had had enough of her life in a small, rural town in Georgia. So she did what most teens do nowadays -- she took to social media to share her feelings of angst, depression, and hopelessness. She was, by all accounts, a person doing the best she could in coping with depression and an alleged abuser within her own home.

What she did, however, is becoming an increasingly common and disturbing consequence of our society virtually ignoring people who are troubled by suicide and suicidal thoughts. She decided to livestream her death on Facebook Live.

This is upsetting to people: "How could they allow such videos to be online?!" "Why don't Facebook and YouTube do something about this?!" But the outrage misses the point completely.

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General

PODCAST: What’s the Difference Between Mental Health and Physical Health?

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe and Vincent discuss the perception that mental health is fundamentally different from physical health. They discuss the lack of biochemical “markers” that can identify physical illnesses and whether we will ever have a simple lab test to diagnose depression, for example. They discuss how physical illness can affect mental health (and vice versa), and ultimately agree that the difference comes down to just one thing.

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Brain and Behavior

Trying to Lose Weight? Maybe You Should Ditch That New Wearable

Wearable technology -- those gadgets people wear around their wrist to track their heart rate or number of steps walked or run -- is all the rage. This sort of personal data tracking is especially popular among younger people and those who exercise regularly. Whether it's a Fitbit, Nike+ Fuelband, a Garmin Vivofit, or some other fitness tracker, people love the ability to easily track their progress over time.

But if you're wearing one of these devices while trying to lose weight, you may find it surprising that wearable technology likely won't help you -- and could even hurt (a little) in your weight-loss journey.

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General

How the Repeal of Obamacare Will Impact People with Mental Illness

When the Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare") was passed into law seven years ago, it signaled a fundamental change in America's healthcare system. After all, in every other first-world, industrialized nation, healthcare is a basic right of citizens. Only in the U.S. has healthcare been seen as primarily a business -- one where profits can be put before people's health.

Now as the Republicans seek to unmake Obamacare with a "repeal and replace" effort, questions have are arising about how exactly this will impact individuals -- both those who depend on Obamacare as a lifeline to affordable healthcare and those who don't. There's a lot of fear and misinformation out there right now, so I'd like to set the record straight.

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General

PODCAST: What Does the 21st Century Cures Act Mean For the Mentally Ill?

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe and Vincent welcome mental health researcher and Psych Central Founder, Dr. John Grohol, to discuss the newly passed 21st Century Cures Act. In addition to other bills, the Act integrated parts of what was previously known as The Murphy Bill or Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act. There has been a lot of talk in the mental health community about how, exactly, the news laws will help people living with mental illness.

Listen as Dr. Grohol explains what impact this law will have on treating mental illness in America. He also explains, in layman’s terms, the details of the new law and offers his expert analysis of how the new laws will affect HIPAA regulations, assisted outpatient treatment, research, and SAMHSA.

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General

Who Looks After the President’s Mental Health?

Nearly 100 years ago, the U.S. appointed the first physician to look after the physical health of the president. As the president's personal doctor, he or she looks after the president's health and well-being, and provides the American public with an annual report on the president's general health.

With all that we've learned about the important and inseparable connection between physical and mental health, might it be time for the president to also have a personal psychologist or psychiatrist? After all, who looks after the president's mental health?

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