Aging

Caregivers: Remember to Care for Yourself

According to the Alzheimer's Association, more than 5 million Americans currently have dementia, with Alzheimer’s dementia being the most common. Over 5 million caregivers are unpaid and devote countless hours to caregiving every year. All this while working and taking care of their own families. In fact, many caregivers are forced to take on a second job in order to help cover their loved ones expenses incurred by their illness of dementia. As one can imagine, over time, the stress of caregiving begins to take a toll, both financially and emotionally, and caregivers’ health begins to suffer.
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Anxiety and Panic

An Immigration Phenomena: The Effects of Forced Migration

And if there was one bitter lesson the times had taught all those “hunted down and forced into exile at a time hostile to all art and all collections, then it is the art of saying goodbye to everything that was once our pride and joy.” - Stefan Zweig
The Need to Belong

An individual’s personality is shaped mostly by their memories of childhood. These memories become one’s ego, strength, and confidence, and further reflect in various aspects of their daily routines and functioning. The association of a man with places, people, relationships, activities and conflicts structures one’s memory and provides one with an identity.
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Alzheimer

Psychology Around the Net: January 21, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

Finally, the weekend is here. That doesn't mean too much to me, however, considering how busy I am with work -- wait. I'm not supposed to say that because...

...today's Psychology Around the Net takes a look at how creativity is born, some not-so-common habits to improve your life, and -- yes -- why saying things like "I'm so busy" might actually be a mindset more than a reality.

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Happiness

Psychology Around the Net: December 31, 2016


Happy New Year, sweet readers!

For a variety of understandable reasons, I know many of you are glad to see 2016 end.

The other night, I was talking (ranting) to my beau about how horrible this year has been and how I can't wait for it to end because it just can't get any worse when -- BOOM! -- common sense knocked me right upside the noggin mid-sentence.

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Habits

8 Tips to Help You Remember

Everyone forgets things now and then. It generally isn’t cause for alarm. The fact is that life is complex, busy and filled with distractions. Sometimes it doesn’t seem like there’s enough time in the day to get everything done. No wonder you forget.

Still, these eight tips to help you remember might be just what you need.
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Brain and Behavior

Fake News: Facebook Helps You Feel Well-Informed, Regardless of Actual Reading

After the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Facebook faces the spotlight for spreading fake news stories. There are now hundreds (perhaps thousands) of fake news web sites -- sites that publish news articles that look and seem to be real, but are complete fiction. Unlike older, well-known satirical websites, such as The Onion, many of these sites don't indicate their fakeness.

But even if Facebook is helping spread fake news more than any other service ever, it begs the question -- do people even read the news stories that appear in their Facebook feed? Let's turn to the science...

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Memory and Perception

What’s in a Name? The Merging of Sound and Mood

Embodied cognition dances in a multi-dimensional universe, existing in thousands of separate guises...

Take, for example, the pair of odd shapes in this image. If asked which shape is called "bouba," and which is "kiki," 98% of people say the blob is "bouba" and the other is "kiki." The reason appears inherent in the shapes: the blob is softer and rounder, the other shape (kiki) is harder and sharper. Bouba is spoken in soft tones, while kiki is spoken in hard tones. The blob shape is calm, the pointed shape is manic.
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Brain and Behavior

Pillow Talk: You Need More Sleep

“You can sleep when you are dead,” a friend chides.

Offering an awkward chuckle, I was too tired to supply a witty response. In America, we stifle our collective yawn to meet the next pressing deadline. But there is a more important deadline than the latest accounting project: our (sleep) health. For a painful few, sleep is an elusive dream.

In American society, we sacrifice sleep for employment or academic obligations. In competitive academic programs, we brag about the number of all-nighters we pull. Time has chronicled the sleep fatigue of first-year residents and its damning effect on patients.
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Aging

A Look at How Our Brains Organize Memories Over Time


Research on the organization of our memory has long been a topic of fascination among neuroscientists given that this could lead to treatments for reversing cognitive impairments. Here, we review some recent findings on how memory is organized which show the importance of a coordinated “wave” of neuronal activity in spatial navigation, and the temporal nature underlying how linked memories are encoded.

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Aging

Psychology Around the Net: October 1, 2016


Ah, October, my absolute favorite month. How I've missed thee.

This year, I get to start off my favorite month at a wedding later today, watching two sweet friends marry and begin their lives together.

Speaking of marriage, let's take a look at some of this week's latest in mental health topics such as surviving a marriage with a special needs child as well as how the "selfie culture" is affecting young women's mental health, today's most common personality type, how your body reacts to food when you're stressed, and more.

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