Ethics & Morality

Are Psychiatrists Allowed to Publicly Diagnose the President?

As much as we’d like to believe that psychiatrists -- as well as other mental health professionals -- are above reproach, the truth is that they are people first. And people come with opinions, biases, and agendas. It’s because they are people first that governing bodies have come up with rules to govern their professional ethics.

Most of these rules are obvious and well understood. Psychiatrists aren’t permitted to date their patients, for example. But other rules aren’t as well known, such as the
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Children and Teens

The Happiness You Want for Your Child May Not Be Real Happiness

At the slightest hint of unhappiness from a child, parents move to fix it -- it’s a mental act, and it’s natural, human, and typical.

Why would we rather watch our kids suffer when we can put a smile on their faces? Ask most parents what they desire for their children, they will say, “I want my kids to be happy.” While our intention is valid, it sometimes becomes our obsession and influences how we interact with them and every decision we make to see them happy.
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ADHD and ADD

The Ethics of Armchair Diagnosis

When you resort to name calling, you’ve lost the argument. When you resort to diagnosing, they’ve lost credibility. Is it any wonder why non-mental health professionals are diagnosing people out of anger?  


Some people diagnose because of a disagreement. How many times have we heard a friend relay stories about his "bipolar" girlfriend after they have ended the relationship? Or what about a frustrated mother who is fed up with her son’s “ADD” when he refuses to do homework?

When someone does the opposite of what we want them to, it is tempting to label the behavior as a scientific defect. When the problem person has been labeled with a disorder, the blame is completely within their body. We, are off the hook.
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Children and Teens

Psychology Around the Net: May 27, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

If you're here in the States, I hope you're enjoying your long holiday weekend; however, before you hit the outdoors take a moment to check out the latest in this week's mental health news! Learn about mindfulness-focused childbirth, why it's important for veterans to help other veterans with mental health, how one of the most well-known billionaires today achieves happiness, and more.

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Addiction

Psychology Around the Net: April 1, 2017


Happy April Fool's, sweet readers!

Oh, how I love this day. I love jokes, pranks, tricks -- everything designed to make me laugh (as long as it doesn't hurt others, of course). Not only does it amuse me, but it's also good for my mental health. Yes, I know, many of you know the drill, but for those of you who don't, check out the NCBI's Therapeutic Benefits of Laughter in Mental Health: A Theoretical Review (the abstract is easy reading, I promise).

Now, let's get on with it, shall we?

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Ethics & Morality

Tolerance Must Be Intentional

It is virtually impossible to grow up white in America completely free of racism or bias. We are a country which was built upon the genocide of one race, and the enslavement and brutalizing of another. White, and male, superiority was written into our original Constitution, and has taken centuries to soften. Much as well-meaning and ethical white people would like to avoid them, racist notions seep in under our doors, appear unbidden on our screens, as much as does body distortion for women and hyper-masculinity for men.
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Ethics & Morality

A Fundamental Human Need

As odd as it sounds, survival in life parallels survival in wartime. World War II, to this day, maintains its place as the most popular war in American history -- as well it should.

An argument can be made that the Vietnam War should not have been fought. An argument can be made that the Iraq War should not have been fought.  
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Bullying

The Mental Health Impact of Racism on Students

Since the presidential election, American primary and secondary schools have seen a
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Ethics & Morality

Expressing Gratitude Throughout the Year

Now that Thanksgiving is over, and everyone has expressed lots of gratitude to their family, friends, co-workers, over Facebook, and through other social media outlets, does this mean we are done with expressing gratitude? It shouldn’t mean that, but often it does.

Gratitude is a practice that should be expressed on a daily basis. Studies have shown that expressing gratitude can increase your level of happiness. Our brain often has a negativity bias, meaning...
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Children and Teens

What ‘Stranger Things’ Can Teach Us about Parenting

If you are one of the few out there who have not seen it: Stranger Things is a science fiction series that is very reminiscent of "The Goonies." The story takes place in 1983 and the central plot line follows a group of four boys. In the first episode, one of the four boys goes missing. The three remaining best friends do their best to find and rescue their friend. They do so independent of adults. They work together as a team (mostly) and it all involves a lot of bike-riding. We all love the nostalgia in this throw-back drama. As an instructor of college courses in Infant and Child Development, I was immediately hooked on how the show depicted the preadolescent gang of boys.

Prior to the disappearance of their friend, the main characters spend their free-time riding bikes and playing Dungeons and Dragons, a table-top role-playing game. After the disappearance, they use the skills learned through years of friendship and freedom to participate in their own mystery man-hunt. If these kids survive what they are up against, every major CEO would want to hire them. They are smart, creative, team-players who are confident in their abilities to solve problems.
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Addiction

How Sex Addiction Can Change Mental Illness

I was married to a sex addict narcissist for close to 20 years. My father was a sex addict. I was a stripper many years ago and worked for many years around sex addicts. It started when I visited my father’s house on his weekend to have me after my parents' divorce. He was at work and I was a nosy child. I found a Playboy magazine. I remember it well. Suzanne Somers was on the cover. I slowly turned each page, looking at and soaking in the beauty and perfection of these women.

My immediate thought was that these women looked nothing like my mom. They were doing things my mom would never have done. I think I was only 8 or 9 years old. In that moment, I knew in my mind, like it was complete truth, that if I grew up and became a woman like that, I would be able to keep a man.

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