Anorexia

Pickles, Mustard & Diet Coke: Self-Talk in Eating Disorder Recovery

Oh…and shirataki noodles. Anyway…

I am a recovering anorexic. Well... most of the time. Sometimes I'm just "anorexic." (Relapse is part of recovery, right??)

Regardless of how “evolved” I may be now, nearly every comment made about my physical appearance, or my intake, or my weight... cuts through me like a knife. People think that they are being kind, but they don't hear their words through the same ED filter that I do. 
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Anorexia

Braving the Binge

It is 2 AM. The apartment is still. Empty jars of peanut butter, quarts of ice cream, and entire boxes of granola bars. Gone. Hundreds to thousands of calories consumed in just minutes. A food spread of shame. Of procrastination. Of emptiness. Of I don’t know what. Fast forward to the next day. On the outside, you see a petite girl who's joyous, who's positive, who's present. On the inside: severe stomach pains, body aches, chest discomfort. And those are just the physical effects. I am drained. I am disgusted. I am trapped. Cycles of isolation feeding isolation. Literally.
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Anorexia

Eating Disorders: Learning to Be Okay in the Rain

Psychologist Abraham Maslow developed the Maslow Hierarchy of Needs. This hierarchy looks like a pyramid, with each level building on the one below it. The very bottom, basic need a person must fulfill is entitled the "physiological needs." A component within the physiological needs is food, i.e. eating. So, this may pose a thought for some: Why, if food were available, not scarce, would this basic need in life be so hard for some people to act upon?

This leads us to the question: What is an eating disorder?
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Anorexia

Brain Stimulation Could Be a Viable Treatment for Anorexia


Anorexia nervosa affects millions of people throughout the world. It has a high mortality rate and the therapies that are currently available are highly ineffective. Yet only 10–30% of adults with anorexia recover with psychotherapy, and pharmacological treatments have a low efficacy. The need for better treatments is obvious and urgent.

Research has revealed a number of changes which occur in the brain of patients with anorexia. These include both structural and functional deficits such as the loss of grey matter in areas that play important roles in the regulation of feeding behavior, reward, emotion and motivation. It is believed that anorexia may be associated with a dysregulation of inhibitory and reward systems, which lays the ground for compulsive and obsessive behaviors to arise.

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Anorexia

Psychology Around the Net: April 9, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

As you read this, I'm probably looking out my window wondering where spring went. (Snow? Really?) Or, if the weather forecast is wrong -- *fingers crossed* -- I'm outside romping around with my dog.

Regardless of your weather situation and how it affects your Saturday plans, you must check out the latest in mental health news this week first. Want to know about the possible negative impact of smartphone apps designed to help mental health management? We have it. How about signs that you're experiencing "sympathy pains" from your partner's depression? We have that, too.

Oh, and on a more upbeat scale, we've thrown in an inspiring call-to-action from the award-winning violinist and YouTube superstar, Lindsey Stirling.

Enjoy!

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ADHD and ADD

Be More Careful with Your Language

I tend to be a little over the top in my criticism of people’s mistaken language and grammar. I am by no means perfect when it comes to these areas, but there are some errors that cause me to want to smack people. (Not in a violent way, but more in a, “I’m taking my glove off and slapping you across the face with it to show you how stupid you are” sort of way.)

One such phrase is, “I could care less.” If you could care less, that means you care some. You should actually be saying, “I couldn’t care less,” because that implies that you have supplied the least amount of caring possible.

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ADHD and ADD

Psychology Around the Net: November 21, 2015


With Thanksgiving just a few days away, we're in the throes of the holiday season here in America; unfortunately, this isn't a happy time for all. However, psychologists have a few tips and tricks to keep your holiday blues in check.

Of course, we've also got the latest on sex and happiness, how a mother's age could affect her daughter's mental health, whether your child's ADHD medication puts him or her at risk for bullying, and more.

Have a happy Saturday!

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Addiction

Understanding Orthorexia

"Ah, I can't do lunch, but would you want to grab coffee later on?" This is something I would say often to my friends. My circle was growing smaller. I rarely saw friends or even family. My apartment was my temple. The holder of all things healthy.

I prepared all of my meals after returning from my trip to Whole Foods. It was Sunday, my meal prep day, where I would hover over a stove baking bland free-range chicken, grass-fed steaks, organic broccoli and sweet potatoes.
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Addiction

How Connection Saves Us from Addiction

Humans suffer most when we lack connection. Take, for example, Tom Hanks with his volleyball, Wilson, in the movie "Cast Away." I was distraught when he lost Wilson and cried as though my personal friend had drowned at sea.

We will force connection with inanimate objects, if we must, because we’re hardwired to crave it, to need it.

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Anorexia

Is My Massage Therapist Judging My Body?

In the dim room I’m told to undress to my comfort level. When the therapist gets to my legs I blurt out, “Sorry they’re not shaved. I have a waxing appointment tomorrow.” She runs her forearm up the back of my thigh and I imagine my pockets of cellulite coagulating.

I imagine she’s observing my fat and judging me.

For anyone who’s ever struggled with body image, those words burn with an astute reflection. There were years when I constantly thought that people were observing my body and judging me.
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Anorexia

Eating Disorder Recovery: What an Imperfect Health Care System Taught Me

Eight years in I knew I needed help for my eating disorder, but I was still trying to convince myself I’d get better on my own. I’d like to say I chose to go to the hospital because I had faith in recovery and made a healthy choice. But the truth is often different from surface appearance.

After coming home in constant fear that he’d find me dead, my husband finally told me if I didn’t get help he couldn’t be married to me anymore. A part of me had been watching.
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