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ADHD and ADD

Physical Health and Mental Health, Part 3: Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

This is Part 3 in the "Physical Health and Mental Health" series. Click to read Part 1 and Part 2.
There is a strong relationship between Physical Health and Mental Health. Both play a significant role in our lives. It has been found that staying physically fit actually helps our mental health as well.  When our physical health is poor it puts a great strain on our mental health.
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ADHD and ADD

Physical Health and Mental Health, Part 2: Exercising Regularly

This is Part 2 in a series. Read Part 1 here: "Physical Health and Mental Health, Part 1: Eating Healthfully".
The relationship between Physical Health and Mental Health plays a significant role in our lives. It has been found that staying physically fit actually helps our mental health as well. When our physical health is poor it puts a great strain on our mental health.
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ADHD and ADD

You May Need to Rethink Medication for ADHD

Let me start by saying that the decision to give medication to a child always rests with the parent. If a parent feels uncomfortable about medication, they should not be shamed or coerced into feeling differently. That being said, there is a lot of misinformation and misguided notions out there on not only ADHD medication, but the disease itself. My goal is to educate people on what ADHD is, what it is not, and the facts regarding treatment. I have no agenda other than that, and no, there is no pharmaceutical company paying for this article. Let’s answer some questions!
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ADHD and ADD

Psychology Around the Net: November 5, 2016


I'm going to the mountains today; in fact, I might be there by the time you read this.

Of course, this isn't exactly unusual, given my state is fairly well known for its mountains. I'm sort of always surrounded by mountains, even when I'm grocery shopping. Nevertheless, earlier this week, a friend of mine sent a random text asking if I'd be interested in spending a day in an especially beautiful area of the state a couple of hours away.

"YES."

Without hesitation.

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ADHD and ADD

What to Expect When You Love a Woman with ADHD

"We are stronger and smarter than our reactive selves." I wrote this in an article shared on elephant journal, and I was referring to our intellectual self -- versus our reactive self. I received many questions and comments about this statement, so I took some time to reflect and dig further about what this means to me. And as a woman with ADHD (inattentive subtype), it is a daily struggle to control my impulses from reacting quickly.

I trust my "intellectual self;" she has solid judgment, but my reactive self can be stronger. Almost as though my mind and my body are in constant conflict.
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ADHD and ADD

Reducing One of the Most Painful Symptoms of ADHD

Many adults with ADHD feel shame. A bottomless, all-encompassing shame. They feel shame for having ADHD in the first place. They feel shame for procrastinating or not being as productive as they think they “should” be. They feel shame for forgetting things too quickly. They feel shame for missing deadlines or important appointments. They feel shame for not finishing tasks or following through. They feel shame for being disorganized or impulsive. They feel shame for not paying the bills on time or keeping up with other household tasks.

Shame is “probably one of the most painful symptoms of ADHD and one of the hardest challenges to overcome,” said Nikki Kinzer, PCC, an ADHD coach, author and co-host of “Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast." Some adults with ADHD live with shame every day, she said.
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Addiction

The Dangers of Rising Adderall Abuse among Teens

Call it a case of unintended consequences. Twenty years ago, the prescription medication Adderall debuted as a treatment for narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A stimulant, with amphetamine as its active ingredient, Adderall helped sufferers of narcolepsy stay awake, but it also increased mental focus and endurance for those diagnosed with ADHD.

Because of its effectiveness and relatively mild side effects, Adderall quickly became a common treatment for ADHD. But as its popularity increased, use of Adderall also began spreading beyond the people it was intended for. Today, students without ADHD regularly take Adderall as a study aid, in order to work longer and later than they would be able to otherwise. In 2009, 5 percent of American high school students were using Adderall for non-medical reasons, according to a University of Michigan Study—a rate that increased to 7 percent in 2013. A recent review of multiple studies published in the journal Postgraduate Medicine estimated that up to 10 percent of high school students and 5 to 35 percent of college students are misusing stimulants.
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ADHD and ADD

If You Don’t Have One True Calling, That’s a Good Thing — Here’s Why

One of the most significant generational differences between millennials and older members of the workforce is the contrasting mindset around career path.

Not so long ago, the average employee joined a company straight out of college, worked his or her way up from entry level to middle ground, and eventually joined the upper echelons of management, hardly stopping to give other employers a second glance. There was a much more linear development of career growth, which also included now-mythical concepts such as pensions and six weeks of accrued paid time off.
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ADHD and ADD

5 Ways to Motivate a Child With ADHD


Get what you want with less frustration!

It should be simple, really: You ask your child to do something, and they do it!

Getting fellow adults to do as you ask is challenging. But, with ADHD kids — all kids, actually — it is more complex than that. (As you probably know.)

Ask and ye shall receive? Not really! You have to work at it.

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ADHD and ADD

The Many Conditions that Mimic Depression

Finding the right diagnosis for any disorder requires a comprehensive evaluation. Indeed, many illnesses share many of the same symptoms.

Take symptoms such as headache, stomachache, dizziness, fatigue, lethargy, insomnia and appetite loss. There are countless conditions with these exact indications.

Similarly, many mental illnesses share the same symptoms, said Stephanie Smith, PsyD, a psychologist in practice in Erie, Colo., who specializes in working with individuals with depression. Which makes “the process of diagnosing mental illness tricky, to say the least.”
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