ADHD and ADD

How Do You Stay Motivated When You Want to Give Up?

“Of course, motivation is not permanent. But then, neither is bathing; but it is something you should do on a regular basis.” – Zig Ziglar
If you are like most people, there are days when you just aren’t feelin’ it. It might mean hiding under the covers rather than throwing them off to face the day. It could look like setting goals and then missing the mark, as in archery, followed by taking your ball and bat and going home. I know, I'm mixing metaphors, but I'm sure you get the idea.
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ADHD and ADD

Stressed Out Teens & Empathic Parents: What to Do When It’s Contagious?

Though we hear a lot about the effect of parents on children’s development, parenting, like other close relationships, is a reciprocal interaction -- not a one-way street. Children with difficult challenges, such as executive function deficits, can tax any parent’s equilibrium. Parents of teens with such issues are often overwhelmed and under increased stress.
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ADHD and ADD

Physical Health and Mental Health, Part 3: Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

This is Part 3 in the "Physical Health and Mental Health" series. Click to read Part 1 and Part 2.
There is a strong relationship between Physical Health and Mental Health. Both play a significant role in our lives. It has been found that staying physically fit actually helps our mental health as well.  When our physical health is poor it puts a great strain on our mental health.
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ADHD and ADD

Physical Health and Mental Health, Part 2: Exercising Regularly

This is Part 2 in a series. Read Part 1 here: "Physical Health and Mental Health, Part 1: Eating Healthfully".
The relationship between Physical Health and Mental Health plays a significant role in our lives. It has been found that staying physically fit actually helps our mental health as well. When our physical health is poor it puts a great strain on our mental health.
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ADHD and ADD

You May Need to Rethink Medication for ADHD

Let me start by saying that the decision to give medication to a child always rests with the parent. If a parent feels uncomfortable about medication, they should not be shamed or coerced into feeling differently. That being said, there is a lot of misinformation and misguided notions out there on not only ADHD medication, but the disease itself. My goal is to educate people on what ADHD is, what it is not, and the facts regarding treatment. I have no agenda other than that, and no, there is no pharmaceutical company paying for this article. Let’s answer some questions!
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ADHD and ADD

Psychology Around the Net: November 5, 2016


I'm going to the mountains today; in fact, I might be there by the time you read this.

Of course, this isn't exactly unusual, given my state is fairly well known for its mountains. I'm sort of always surrounded by mountains, even when I'm grocery shopping. Nevertheless, earlier this week, a friend of mine sent a random text asking if I'd be interested in spending a day in an especially beautiful area of the state a couple of hours away.

"YES."

Without hesitation.

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ADHD and ADD

What to Expect When You Love a Woman with ADHD

"We are stronger and smarter than our reactive selves." I wrote this in an article shared on elephant journal, and I was referring to our intellectual self -- versus our reactive self. I received many questions and comments about this statement, so I took some time to reflect and dig further about what this means to me. And as a woman with ADHD (inattentive subtype), it is a daily struggle to control my impulses from reacting quickly.

I trust my "intellectual self;" she has solid judgment, but my reactive self can be stronger. Almost as though my mind and my body are in constant conflict.
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ADHD and ADD

Reducing One of the Most Painful Symptoms of ADHD

Many adults with ADHD feel shame. A bottomless, all-encompassing shame. They feel shame for having ADHD in the first place. They feel shame for procrastinating or not being as productive as they think they “should” be. They feel shame for forgetting things too quickly. They feel shame for missing deadlines or important appointments. They feel shame for not finishing tasks or following through. They feel shame for being disorganized or impulsive. They feel shame for not paying the bills on time or keeping up with other household tasks.

Shame is “probably one of the most painful symptoms of ADHD and one of the hardest challenges to overcome,” said Nikki Kinzer, PCC, an ADHD coach, author and co-host of “Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast." Some adults with ADHD live with shame every day, she said.
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