ADHD and ADD

What Is Intention Deficit Disorder?

Most readers of this article are familiar with the term ADHD which is defined as "a brain disorder marked by an ongoing pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development."

What is less familiar is the term, "intention deficit disorder," a different way to look at the problems associated with attention deficit disorder. What is intention deficit disorder and how can it be helped?

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ADHD and ADD

I Chose Not to Medicate My ADHD — Here’s Why

A white room.

The day I was diagnosed, they brought me into a (not kidding) white room with a metal table. There was a machine at the head of the table. The machine kind of reminded me of a shrunken MRI scanner, but I didn’t have much of a chance to study it.  

I laid down, and they put wires all over my head and my chest. The wires were gooey (“How am I going to get that out of my hair?”). Mom had kept me awake for most of the night, so when they told me to go to sleep, and I was out like a light. I was eight years old.
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ADHD and ADD

7 Ways to Clear Out Clutter When You Have ADHD

Clearing out clutter is tough for most people. It can be especially tough when you have ADHD. For instance, the distractibility and forgetfulness may mean you’re regularly misplacing items and then replacing them, which means you end up with duplicates in strange, random spots, said Bonnie Mincu, a senior certified ADHD coach who was diagnosed with ADHD in her 40s.

You might have a hard time deciding what to do with the clutter—and simply give up. “The path of least resistance is to just keep everything and not worry about where to put it,” Mincu said. It’s also hard to know where to start and how to start.
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ADHD and ADD

The Ethics of Armchair Diagnosis

When you resort to name calling, you’ve lost the argument. When you resort to diagnosing, they’ve lost credibility. Is it any wonder why non-mental health professionals are diagnosing people out of anger?  


Some people diagnose because of a disagreement. How many times have we heard a friend relay stories about his "bipolar" girlfriend after they have ended the relationship? Or what about a frustrated mother who is fed up with her son’s “ADD” when he refuses to do homework?

When someone does the opposite of what we want them to, it is tempting to label the behavior as a scientific defect. When the problem person has been labeled with a disorder, the blame is completely within their body. We, are off the hook.
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ADHD and ADD

Have ADHD? Designing an Environment That Ignites Your Attention

When you have ADHD, it can feel like anything and everything hampers your focus. Everything is big and blinding. Everything is distracting. The TV. The slightest sound. The silence. Social media. Your coworkers. Your computer. Your dog.

It can feel like anything and everything is messing with your ability to get stuff done, whether you’re at work, at school or at home. And you need to get this stuff done. Which only adds to your already through-the-roof frustration.
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ADHD and ADD

5 Ways to Support a Spouse with ADHD and Work as a Team

You love your spouse. You love their compassion, clever sense of humor, spontaneous spirit and many other terrific traits. But you find yourself getting more and more frustrated with them. You find yourself taking on most of the responsibilities, like cleaning and paying the bills.

In short, it doesn’t always feel like a 50/50 partnership, said Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, a psychotherapist and ADHD coach who also has ADHD.
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ADHD and ADD

The Cost of Not Paying Attention, and How to Come Back into Balance

Sometimes, when we are not paying attention or attending to what is in front of us in our lives, we throw ourselves out of balance. I was reminded of this last summer when I realized in a moment of panic that I had forgotten to turn the water off from the hose outside that I was using to add some water to our pool. Instead of letting the water run for a half hour or so, I had accidentally let it run for about 24 hours! This was a big mistake on many accounts, with consequences such as overflowing the pool, wasting precious water, potentially draining our well, during a drought no less, not to mention throwing the perfectly balanced water out of balance, as evidenced by the cloudy, murky color that it began to turn!
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ADHD and ADD

ADHD and Adults: More Tips for Creating Structure When Your Job Has None

ADHD affects how you work. It can affect you even more when your job doesn’t come with built-in structure. When you don’t have set hours. When you work from home. When there’s no boss breathing down your neck, waiting for your next report or project.

ADHD can create many challenges for people who don’t have traditional 9 to 5 jobs -- anyone from a real estate agent to a writer to a coach to an independent attorney. For instance, ADHD makes it harder to plan and break down tasks into action steps, said Bonnie Mincu, a senior certified ADHD coach who was diagnosed with ADHD in her 40s. It makes it tougher to prioritize, organize and start projects.
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ADHD and ADD

How I Healed My Inner Child

Growing older does not mean we’ve actually grown “up.” Aging chronologically and mentally are two very different things, as my young adult life so brilliantly demonstrated.

I was completely out of control: alcohol abuse, depression, and if I didn’t get my way, throwing temper tantrums that would make a three year old blush. Well into my twenties, I had the mentality of a rebellious child.

And while I was well aware that my dysfunctional childhood was at the root of my behavior, I had no idea how to rectify this part of me that had been around for almost as long as I had been.
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ADHD and ADD

ADHD and Adults: How to Create a Routine When You Don’t Have a 9 to 5

Maybe you’re an entrepreneur. Maybe you’re a real estate agent or writer. Maybe you’re an artist or a photographer. Maybe you’re a graphic or web designer. Maybe you’re a coach or consultant. Maybe you’re an attorney with your own practice.

Whatever your profession, you aren’t tied to a desk and you don’t have specific work hours -- like 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. And you also have ADHD, which makes not having a built-in structure challenging.
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