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Bipolar

Podcast: Bipolar Advocate Jessie – More Than Just Glenn Close’s Sister

In this episode of the Psych Central Show, hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales welcome Jessie Close, sister of acclaimed actress Glenn Close.

Jessie shares the story of her son’s diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder, followed by her own diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Spurred by a desire to make people more aware of the stigma surrounding mental illness, Jessie reached out to Glenn for help.

The result was the founding of Bring Change to Mind, a nonprofit organization dedicated to encouraging dialogue about mental health, and to raising awareness, understanding, and empathy.

Jessie tells of the making of the incredible public service announcement, directed by Ron Howard, and featuring Glenn, Jessie, and Jessie’s son, Calen.

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Bullying

Victim Shaming and Blaming

With all the allegations coming to light about sexual abuse perpetrated by celebrities, including Harvey Weinstein (no relation to the author of this article), Roy Moore, Louie CK and Kevin Spacey, it seems timely to write an article, about supporting survivors, how to avoid victim shaming, even if it took years to speak up, ways to prevent abuse, as well as means to deal with disillusionment when our icons commit such crimes.

First and foremost is the acknowledgment that sexual assault, whether it comes in the form of words or touch, is about power and control. Sex is merely the vehicle of transmission. It dehumanizes. It steals sovereignty. It robs a person of their sense of safety in their own environment and their own skin. There is no ability to consent when someone has power over another, whether it is economic, legal or by virtue of having given birth to the victim.
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Celebrities

Apologies after Sexual Misconduct: Genuine or Phony?

Many men must be shaking in their boots.

How many more accusations of inappropriate sexual behavior will make the front-page news? And when it does, how will the men respond?

If they take their lead from the President of the United States, who was called on the carpet for his sexually degrading remarks during the election season, they will make an apology that is insincere, inadequate and insipid. “I said it; I was wrong; and I apologized” was designed to call off the dogs and get back to the business of attacking Hillary.
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Bipolar

Psychology Around the Net: October 21, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

It's a gorgeous day here in my neck of the woods, and trust me when I say we'll be taking full advantage of it! After all, the days are getting shorter and soon there won't be as many warm and sunny days (at least, not here) until spring. Many people begin experiencing seasonal affective disorder (SAD) as fall really kicks in. As many of you know, for a lot of people light therapy is an effective way to treat SAD.

However, did you also know light therapy might be able to help with bipolar disorder? That's just one of the topics we're covering in today's Psychology Around the Net!

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Celebrities

#MeToo: You Too?

A viral campaign that has been making the rounds on social media comes equipped with a hashtag and an attempt to bring attention to the prevalence of sexual harassment and abuse, both in the workplace and in personal life. It arose because of the not so secret secret of movie mogul Harvey Weinstein (no relation to this author) threatening and assaulting women.

On October 15th, 2017, actress Alyssa Milano tweeted: "If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet." She
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Anger

Trump’s Nicknames and the Psychology of Bullying

In his Sept. 19 speech before the U.N., Donald Trump mockingly referred to the President of North Korea as “Rocket Man.”

During and after the presidential campaign, Trump bestowed offensive nicknames on several of his opponents. There was, famously, “Crooked Hillary”, but there was also “Little Marco”, “Crazy Bernie” and “Lyin Ted” for Marco Rubio, Bernie Sanders, and Ted Cruz, respectively. Trump also repeatedly referred to Sen. Elizabeth Warren as “Pocahontas,” a jibe at her assertion of Native American heritage. More recently, Trump has given Sen. Chuck Schumer a series of nicknames, including "Head Clown," "Fake Tears" and "Cryin' Chuck."

Why does any of this matter? As a psychiatrist, I believe Trump’s habit of bestowing offensive nicknames opens a window into the psychology of bullying -- and
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Celebrities

Psychology Around the Net: September 2, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

If you're here in America, I hope you're taking advantage of the three-day holiday weekend -- unless, of course, you or a loved one has been hit by tragedy Hurricane Harvey has caused. I've seen so many donation requests over the past few days -- everything from money to basic items you wouldn't even think of (at least I didn't) like diapers -- and it makes me proud to know that even in this country's turbulent times, we're still here for each other.

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Celebrities

Psychology Today Promotes Its Own Trump Fake News

No matter what your political view, it is disconcerting when we run across news online that is not factually correct. President Trump refers to such news stories as "fake news" -- but also includes in this category any news story he simply doesn't agree with.

Earlier this month, Psychology Today ran an article titled, "60,000 Psychologists Say Trump Has 'Serious Mental Illness'."

The problem with this headline? It wasn't true. But that didn't stop the editors at Psychology Today from publishing it on their web site for four consecutive days, before they were called out on the issue on Twitter for its inaccuracy.

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