Brain and Behavior

How to Use Exercise to Overcome Abuse and Bullying and Heal Your Brain

Most therapists, doctors, and mental health professionals recommend exercise to combat depression and anxiety caused by abuse and bullying. However, at no fault of their own, they rarely offer a specific plan. That is because until now it has not been out there. But that has changed recently.

For the first time, we can align exercise routines with mental health issues for recovery. We can align changes to the brain that occur with specific mental health issues with specific movements designed to heal affected brain areas and make people feel better.
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Bipolar

Psychology Around the Net: January 28, 2017


As you read this, I'm hanging with friends in a cabin snuggled in the middle of snow-covered mountains, and I don't feel one bit of guilt about it.

Last week, I mentioned I was extremely busy with a work project. I was scrambling to finish the work (and still provide quality results) because it'd gone on too long. The project was a bigger beast than I'd anticipated, and it took three weeks longer to complete than I estimated.

So, for roughly three weeks, I stayed glued to my laptop, which physically and mentally drained me. I didn't workout, I didn't go out with friends, and because of this perceived "lack of time," my diet (i.e. the foods I ate) started to suffer.

However, I didn't take any steps to change anything -- to take any time for myself outside of showering and going to bed -- because I didn't want to feel guilty.

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Brain and Behavior

The Danger of Lead Exposure to Prenatal Neurodevelopment


During the prenatal period, the fetus begins to form one of the most complex structures in nature, the human brain. This process is called neural embryogenesis and it represents one of the most complicated processes in prenatal life. The process relies on the tight regulation of behavior of the cells that will make up the brain. Neuronal stem cells (NSC) play a key role in embryonic brain development.

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Brain and Behavior

Trying to Lose Weight? Maybe You Should Ditch That New Wearable

Wearable technology -- those gadgets people wear around their wrist to track their heart rate or number of steps walked or run -- is all the rage. This sort of personal data tracking is especially popular among younger people and those who exercise regularly. Whether it's a Fitbit, Nike+ Fuelband, a Garmin Vivofit, or some other fitness tracker, people love the ability to easily track their progress over time.

But if you're wearing one of these devices while trying to lose weight, you may find it surprising that wearable technology likely won't help you -- and could even hurt (a little) in your weight-loss journey.

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Anxiety and Panic

The Number One Mistake in Dealing with Rejection

This is Part Two in a series on Overcoming Rejection. Read Part One here: Overcoming Rejection: 5 Inspiring Lessons from Famous Women.
Tell me if any of this sounds familiar. You’re being criticized by friends, family, or coworkers. You try to defend yourself but you end up feeling embarrassed, angry, or some other negative emotion. Most importantly, this situation happened days ago and you’ve been reliving it in your mind ever since. If this describes you, then you have done post-event processing, which can be one of the most harmful reactions to rejection.
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Brain and Behavior

Suddenly, VC Guy Notices Mental Health Care

The quality and resources available to mental health care and treatment in the United States has been on the downswing since the 1980s. It started with the closing of government-run state psychiatric hospitals (putting our most at-need patients at risk, and often, on the streets), without the government offering a comprehensive network of community-based care to take their place.

Then managed care -- companies driven by profit and greed -- came along and mid-level managers with no mental health background started dictating exactly what kind of mental health treatment was appropriate to which patients.

Now we live in a time where venture capital (VC) firms believe that technology can magically solve many of the ills connected with receiving high-quality, timely mental health care. But of course, like the managed care companies that came before them, many too are simply driven by potential profits and their return on investment, all the while offering the "solution" of lower-quality, shoddier care.

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Anxiety and Panic

When Worrying Takes Over

There are many worriers out there: The man who constantly worries about whether he has or will get cancer or another terrible disease. The woman who lies awake at night, fearing that she will never meet the right one. The grandmother who can’t let go of the idea that the plane with her grandchildren on board might crash. The employee who can’t concentrate because he fears he may have made a mistake that will cost him his job.

They are all different, but worriers also have a lot in common: Unconsciously, they see worrying as a useful strategy to get prepared and gain control.
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Anxiety and Panic

4 Ways to Face Your Fears and Overcome Phobias

We all have them -- fears, phobias, anxieties that shorten our breath, quicken our heartbeats, and sometimes can outright disable us. Some of us shut our eyes and hold our breath as we ride the elevator to the tenth floor of an office building, while others pray the Rosary inside that coffin-like enclosure when getting an MRI.

I am afraid of heights -- in particularly driving over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
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Brain and Behavior

Psychology Around the Net: December 10, 2016


My neck of the woods had its first snow yesterday! It wasn't anything major -- just some steady flurries, really -- but it lasted several hours and made me happy. I love the first snow of the season; it's just...magical to me. It always puts me in a good mood.

According to the forecast, it won't snow any this weekend, but at least I got to enjoy it yesterday.

Anyway, off to this week's mental health news! Get ready for how the 21st Century Cures Act will affect mental health care, a list of essential habits to help boost your everyday life, how training teachers in mental health could help students, and more.

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