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Addiction

Mother’s Memoir of Son’s Opioid Addiction Offers Hope

Lisa Hillman never meant to become a poster child for parents coping with a child’s drug problem. She was an accomplished health care administrator, a fundraising executive married to former Annapolis Mayor Richard Hillman, and the mother of two.

Few people knew about the nightmare that was unfolding at home starting with a phone call from her son’s high school teacher the start of his senior year, alerting her to his possible marijuana use. Jacob’s addiction unraveled from there, resulting in a dependence on opiates that threw his life into reverse: preventing him from returning to the University of Maryland; presenting troubles with the law; and deteriorating most of his relationships, including his once-tight bond with his mom.
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Books

5 Things to Do When Your Child Doesn’t Listen

You ask your child to do something. They refuse. You ask nicely. They still refuse. You raise your voice just a bit to let them know you’re serious. And they refuse, again. You try to bribe them. And you get the same reaction. You finally send them to time-out or try a different discipline technique. And they still refuse—with the added bonus of being in a full-on, ear-splitting, sobbing tantrum.

Sound familiar?
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Anxiety and Panic

How to Befriend the Unknown

We fear the unknown. Which is why we stay in bad relationships, in jobs we hate and in other situations that are not good for us. Because what if the alternative -- the nebulous, nameless alternative -- is worse?

We find comfort in the familiar -- even if that comfort isn’t very comfortable. It’s the known, and the known feels as cozy as an old, tattered and torn sweater, even if it keeps us cold.

But the unknown is packed with potential for possibility and personal growth. “As a lifelong student of Jewish mysticism, a practicing psychotherapist and a spiritual director, I have learned that being receptive to the unknown in all its many facets, allows us to become more open, curious, flexible, and expansive in our personal and professional lives,” writes Estelle Frankel in
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Books

Using Technology to Help Us Practice Mindfulness

Often we think that technology and mindfulness are opposites. We think they're at odds. When we think about practicing mindfulness or meditation, we think about putting away our phones. We think about turning off the TV. We think about shutting down all our devices. We think about digital detoxes.

But technology and mindfulness actually aren’t so incompatible. Even more, we can use technology to help us practice mindfulness.
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Books

Yeah Right — Getting My Teen to Read Would Be a Miracle

It is not unusual to see a teenager with their phone in their hand and their eyes glued to its screen. You may even harbor some concerns that your teen is internet-addicted with the amount of time they spend on their phone. But at least they’re reading something, right?

Well, the research isn’t so sure about that.

Researchers looking at childhood use of smartphones and other devices have found an alarming
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Alcoholism

Psychology Around the Net: July 8, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

I hope you're all having a great weekend (or whatever day you're reading this!), but you definitely want to take a few minutes to check out this week's Psychology Around the Net which tells us more about canine compulsion disorder (and how learning about it helps us also learn about human obsessive-compulsive disorder), the emotional intelligence behind internet trolls, how to deal with friends who always bail, and more.

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Anxiety and Panic

5 Ways to Alleviate Anxiety

When you’re anxious, all you can see is your anxiety. It feels urgent, serious and overwhelming. You wonder if you’ll always feel this way. You wonder, Why me? Why now? Why won’t it stop?

You feel frustrated and hopeless—like there’s nothing you can do.

Thankfully, there is. There are many strategies to help manage and minimize anxiety. Below are five excellent ideas from the new book
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Anxiety and Panic

Coping with Anxiety in School and the Workplace

Anxiety can affect anyone at any stage in their life, but it is one of the most common mental disorders on college campuses. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, forty million American adults suffer from an anxiety disorder, and 75% of those people have reported that their first anxiety episode occurred by the time they were twenty two.

Are you among them? Many of us who suffer from anxiety avoid seeking direct help. The stigma attached to the disorder is too strong, or maybe it's just too embarrassing to open up about it. If you're on a college campus, there will always be someone in student services who can listen and help. If you're not ready for that right now, or are out in the work world, consider these other options.
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Books

Warning! Don’t Expect to Be Motivated by Motivation

I really dislike the word “motivation.” I try never to use it.

In writing Better Than Before, my book about habit change, and in talking to people about their desired habits, the term “motivation” came up a lot.

And here’s why I don’t like it: People use the term to describe their desire for a particular outcome (“I’m really motivated to lose weight”) as well as their reasons for actually acting in a certain way (“I go to the gym because I’m motivated to exercise”). Desire and action are mixed up in a very confusing way.
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Bipolar

How to Let Go of the Thoughts that Cause Depression

Depression is different from other illnesses in that, in addition to the physiological symptoms (loss of appetite, nervousness, sleeplessness, fatigue), there are the accompanying thoughts that can be so incredibly painful. For example, when my Raynaud’s flares up, the numbness in my fingers can be uncomfortable, but it doesn’t tell me that I am worthless, pathetic, and that things will never ever get better. During severe depressive episodes, however, these thoughts can be
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Books

Psychology Around the Net: April 8, 2017


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

If you're wondering what's up with the "Happy Birthday" sign, well, yesterday the World Health Organization (WHO) celebrated the anniversary of its launch in 1948 -- as well as the annual World Health Day event.

Other topics in this week's Psychology Around the Net include how climate change affects our mental health, why some people are genetically programmed to be night owls, the tragic loss of Amy Bleuel, and more.

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