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Depression

True Story: One Father’s Struggle with Postpartum Depression


Dads get the “baby blues” too.

People might not realize this, but, after the birth of a child, both women and men can encounter symptoms of postpartum depression. I’m speaking from experience here.

After the birth of my daughter, which endures as one of the happiest moments of my life, I found myself struggling with unexpected waves of anxiety, fear, and depression.

It was horrible, and what made it worse, was that I was very uncomfortable talking about it.

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General

Dealing with the Looming Cloud of the Possibility of Early Death

Five years ago, I had breast cancer. To rid myself of it, I had chemotherapy, radiation and a double mastectomy.

Flash forward five years. One day, I noticed a strange, bright red splotch on my breast, the breast where the cancer had been. The doctor did a biopsy of it, and the results came back malignant. It was an angiosarcoma, and the suspected cause was the radiation treatment I’d had five years before. This was a very rare form of cancer that, again, results sometimes from the radiation itself. That which was meant to heal me, made me ill.
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Marriage and Divorce

5 Qualities to Look for in a Life Partner

Romantic relationships are a challenge for everyone.

No matter how great couples seem on Facebook, no matter how many loving, hugging, kissing photos you see of your friends, no intimate relationship is trouble-free.

That’s because of two facts that are in complete conflict with each other:

Fact #1: All of us have inborn needs for love, care, and attention, which when not met trigger core emotions of anger and sadness. Over time, we can defend against these needs in a variety of ways. But that doesn’t mean the emotions aren’t happening  --  we’ve just blocked them from conscious experience.
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ADHD and ADD

What to Expect When You Love a Woman with ADHD

"We are stronger and smarter than our reactive selves." I wrote this in an article shared on elephant journal, and I was referring to our intellectual self -- versus our reactive self. I received many questions and comments about this statement, so I took some time to reflect and dig further about what this means to me. And as a woman with ADHD (inattentive subtype), it is a daily struggle to control my impulses from reacting quickly.

I trust my "intellectual self;" she has solid judgment, but my reactive self can be stronger. Almost as though my mind and my body are in constant conflict.
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Bipolar

You’re Depressed, But Are You Depressed Depressed?

Depression is a slippery word. Like many mental health terms, the way people use it in everyday speech doesn’t always line up with the clinical meaning of the word.

We might say: "This year’s presidential election is depressing." It’s understood, of course, that we aren’t literally claiming the electoral process has triggered a serious mood disorder that’s interfering with our day-to-day functioning.

In other cases, the line between colloquial "depression" and clinical depression gets a little more subtle. What’s the difference between being depressed and having a really bad day -- or a really bad month for that matter?
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Children and Teens

How Can Childhood Emotional Neglect Make You a Stronger Adult?


All it takes is growing up in a household where your feelings don't matter enough.

With their heads held high but their spirits lower than should be, they walk among us.

"I don't need any help," they say with a smile. But "what do you need?" they ask others with genuine interest.

Loved and respected by all who know them, they struggle to love and respect themselves. These are the people of Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN).

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Anger

10 Ways to Beat Frustration

Frustration may be commonplace, but it isn’t inevitable. Furthermore, there are constructive things you can do to get past it. Before you give up and give in to this insidious emotion, check out these 10 ways to beat frustration.

1. You always need a plan.



It may be tempting to wing it, coming up with an approach on the fly, but this is no way to deal with attempting to achieve goals. Without a solid plan, you’re left adrift, vulnerable to the first strong challenge or obstacle in your path.
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Books

Psychology Around the Net: October 29, 2016


Happy Saturday, sweet readers!

This week's Psychology Around the Net covers a myriad of interesting topics, if I do say so myself!

Keep reading for information on how the way you twist your paperclips could highlight your personality (yes, really), a new three-second brain exercises to help you find joy (it's a lot deeper, and yet just as simple, as it sounds), a few misconceptions some of us might have about male sexuality, and more.

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Alternative and Nutritional Supplements

8 Fall Foods I Eat to Improve My Mood

Even with its gorgeous foliage and festivities, autumn triggers anxiety and depression for many people. The shorter days and lack of sunlight affect our circadian rhythms; we feel the stress of upcoming holidays; and the claustrophobia of winter is lurking around the corner. I’m not a dietitian, but I’ve learned a lot from experts about food and mood, and I’ve learned what works for me.

Mother Nature, fortunately, has done her part in providing many foods and spices during this season that can aid our sanity. From enjoying freshly picked apples to munching on dry pumpkin seeds, autumn is full of good-mood foods that can help us enjoy the season.
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Alcoholism

Are You Using Alcohol as a Crutch?

One of my friends hasn’t had a drink in over a year. She stopped drinking because she realized that it clouded her thinking. She realized that she was using alcohol to relieve stress and escape from her thoughts and feelings. No one would call her an “alcoholic.” In fact, many of her friends don’t understand why she quit.

But, without alcohol, she’s seen many positive changes. She has more clarity. She feels more motivated. She sleeps better. She’s more present in her life.

We think of drinking in two ways: Either you’re a normal drinker. Or you’re an alcoholic. Either you have a serious problem. Or you don’t. But drinking is way more nuanced and much more layered than that.
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Best of Our Blogs

Best of Our Blogs: October 28, 2016

Too often we let our illness, past, and differences prevent us from living fully. We're afraid of getting hurt or we think we aren't deserving. So we wait. Some of us wait never experiencing what it's like to truly be.

Outwardly we pretend to be like everyone else. We hide our eccentricities. Secretly, we're resentful and in pain. But whole living isn't about being perfect or "normal" even. It's embracing the life we have. It's allowing ourself the freedom to be.

Let this excerpt from Mary Oliver's poem The Summer Day shine a light on your life and the beauty of being alive.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn't everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?
—Mary Oliver
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