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Internet use cutting into TV viewing and socializing

Internet use cutting into TV viewing and socializing

The average Internet user in the United States spends three hours a day online, with much of that time devoted to work and more than half of it to communications, according to a survey conducted by a group of political scientists.

The survey found that use of the Internet has displaced television watching and a range of other activities. Internet users watch television for one hour and 42 minutes a...
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Medicine’s Data Gap: Doctors, Too, Ask: Is This Drug Right?

Medicine's Data Gap: Doctors, Too, Ask: Is This Drug Right? (NY Times, free reg. req'd)

Across the country, doctors are struggling to decide which pain relievers to prescribe now that they know that popular drugs like Vioxx and Celebrex pose potentially serious heart risks. "We are desperately in need of information," said Dr. Stephen Brenner, an internist in New Haven. Yet for at least two years, doctors at the Mayo Clinic, the federal Veterans Affairs Department and the Kaiser Permanente health plan have been...
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What to do if you overdo

What to do if you overdo

There are some tricks to avoid holiday overindulgence

"Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation"

- Ben Franklin

I have this friend, who will remain nameless. Let's just say that I know her very well. Her problem is that, if the food is there, she eats it. At holiday parties she hovers around the food table; she bakes cookies for friends and gives them the half that remains; on Christmas Day she looks forward to the...
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Providing Open Access to Psychological and Social Sciences Research

The National Institutes of Health proposed back in September 2004 mandated Open Access for all NIH-funded research. The Science Commons project was created to encourage scientific innovation by making it easier for scientists, universities, and industries to use literature, data, and other scientific intellectual property and to share their knowledge with others. Science Commons works within current copyright and patent law to promote legal and technical mechanisms that remove barriers to sharing.

It may be that this effort isn't really even...
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Mice Study May Help Human Depression

Mice whose brains lack a specific protein react differently to stress than other mice, possibly offering a clue into the source of human depression, researchers at Washington University said in a study released Monday.

The St. Louis researchers, using genetically engineered mice, found they developed an imbalance in a hormone involved in stress response. During stressful situations, those mice behave as if they are depressed.

Mice studies can helpfully lead researchers to understand more about human behavior, but they're not directly comparable. It generally...
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Asia disaster toll near 60,000

Asia disaster toll near 60,000

Stricken Indian Ocean nations are worked swiftly to bury thousands of bodies as experts warn disease could kill as many people as the 60,000 already dead from the violent crush of Sunday's tsunami.

While governments and rescuers tried to cope on Wednesday with the aftermath of possibly the deadliest tsunami in more than 200 years, the United Nations mobilised what it called the biggest relief operation in its history.

This tragedy will easily top 100,000 casualties before it's one of...
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Treating Childhood Anxiety Prevents Adult Disorders

Treating Childhood Anxiety Prevents Adult Disorders

Panic disorders, phobias and other childhood anxiety conditions should be treated during childhood so that they won't be carried over into adulthood, according to advice in the latest Harvard Mental Health Letter.

Various studies show that anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric conditions present during childhood. In many instances, adults with anxiety disorders experienced their first symptoms during their early childhood...
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To Treat Autism, Parents Take a Leap of Faith

To Treat Autism, Parents Take a Leap of Faith (NY Times, free reg. req'd))

The most recent analysis of treatment research, financed by the National Institutes of Health and scheduled to be published next year, concludes that although behavior treatments benefit many children, there is no evidence that any particular treatment leads to recovery. Doctors do not yet know how to predict which children will improve in the treatments, or even how treatable the condition is, the report concludes.

"If so many kids are being...
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Exploding the Self-Esteem Myth

Exploding the Self-Esteem Myth

Boosting people's sense of self-worth has become a national preoccupation. Yet surprisingly, research shows that such efforts are of little value in fostering academic progress or preventing undesirable behavior.

A great article about the conflicting research findings in the area of self-esteem. What you accept as common knowledge about self-esteem (that research shows it helps people achieve more in their lives) is simply not...
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