advertisement
Home » Ask the Therapist » Why Do I Keep Loosing Track of Time?

Why Do I Keep Loosing Track of Time?

Asked by on with 1 answer:

I have several issues but the main one that I do not have answers to is; why I keep losing track of time?
It occurs in periods like for example in January I cannot remember what I’ve learned in school, the conversations I’ve had and sometimes I forget what I’ve done in a 24h period. And the next month I’m fine.

I sometimes see shadows of objects that aren’t there and I hear noises when I’m alone.
I want to lock myself in a mental hospital, because I feel like I’m going crazy.

I have Trichotillomania, depression and PTSD. (From Sweden)

Why Do I Keep Loosing Track of Time?

Answered by on -

A.

Thank you for taking the time to reach out to us with your concerns. Let’s begin with trichotillomania (hair pulling.) As this Psych Central article will explain this condition is about repetitively pulling out of one’s own hair from any region of the body, such as the scalp, eyelids or eyebrows, or even facial hair, hair from your arms, legs, armpits, or pubic hair. The hair-pulling sites may vary over time and the triggers for this typically range from anxiety, boredom, and stress. The hair-pulling itself can result in relief. This sets up a type of cycle where the various frustrations fuel the need for relief.

Two conditions, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression, are quite often connected to it. I mention this because depression symptoms can vary from mild to severe and can include:

  • Feeling sad or having a depressed mood
  • Disengaged, with a loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed
  • Changes in appetite (weight loss or gain unrelated to dieting)
  • Insomnia or sleeping too much.
  • Loss of energy or increased fatigue
  • Anxiety-related physical activity (e.g., hand-wringing or pacing) or slowed movements and speech (actions observable by others)
  • Loss of meaning or purpose, feeling worthless or guilty
  • Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

This means that many of your concerns about concentration and memory may be affected by the depression, which causes stress, which in turn creates the need for relief and the desire for hair-pulling. There may be a progressive sequence that has been created that makes it difficult to break this vicious cycle.

This means it is important to work with one therapist to unravel the triggers that create this downward spiral. Get someone who can help you plan the best way to approach this. I’d recommend working with someone who can help you create a way for you to increase your self-awareness about this cycle, which in turn I believe will give you some relief.

For a first-person account from PsychCentral own Gabe Howard check out his blog here.

Wishing you patience and peace,
Dr. Dan
Proof Positive Blog @ PsychCentral

Why Do I Keep Loosing Track of Time?

TALK TO A THERAPIST NOW:
Therapists live, online right now, from BetterHelp:

Daniel J. Tomasulo, PhD, TEP, MFA, MAPP

Dan Tomasulo Ph.D., TEP, MFA, MAPP teaches Positive Psychology in the graduate program of Counseling and Clinical Psychology at Columbia University, Teachers College and works with Martin Seligman, the Father of Positive Psychology in the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) program at the University of Pennsylvania. He is Director of the New York Certification in Positive Psychology for the Open Center in New York City and on faculty at New Jersey City University. Sharecare has honored him as one of the top 10 online influencers on the topic of depression. For more information go to: http://www.dare2behappy.com/. He also writes for Psych Central's Ask the Therapist column and the Proof Positive blog.

APA Reference
Tomasulo, D. (2020). Why Do I Keep Loosing Track of Time?. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 26, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2020/05/06/why-do-i-keep-loosing-track-of-time/
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 5 May 2020 (Originally: 6 May 2020)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 5 May 2020
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.