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Child Sexual Bullying

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I have a 32yr old special needs daughter. she doesn’t walk or talk.. she’s in diaper…I also have custody of my 12yr old grandson. He belongs to my other daughter
I’ve had him for about 6yrs..
I can barely bring myself to say the words..
But I caught my grandson touching my daughter inappropriately…very inappropriately..
Please help me..I don’t want my daughter at risk..I also don’t want my grandson removed from my care..
Does it mean that he has extreme issues?
He said he hates himself for it and that it will never happen again.. i’ve explained that it’s normal to be curious at his age bur that he ABSOLUTELY CAN NOT TOUCH HER AGAIN..
I’m worried about both of them and I’m so scared of what’s going to happen to our family..
I can get him the help that he needs I just want to do what’s best and right for both of them but I pray that can be done while keeping my family intact…
PLEASE PLEASE I’M BEGGING YOU PLEASE HELP US

Child Sexual Bullying

Answered by on -

A.

It would have been helpful to have had the details about the specific behavior that your grandson engaged in. Without that information, it’s difficult for me to give you a thorough answer. Thus, my answer will be general in nature.

Regarding your specific question about whether or not he has “extreme” issues, the answer depends on what he did. The fact that he seems remorseful is a good sign. It means that he is sorry and seems to realize that he has made a very big mistake.

In the meantime, it would be best that he never be left alone with your daughter. Though he seems remorseful and embarrassed, you can’t be certain that it won’t happen again. If I knew more, I would be better able to predict whether or not he would repeat his behavior. At 12 years of age, he’s very immature and inexperienced and has limited control over his behavior. This may be especially true when it comes to his sexual impulses. He may have been acting out of curiosity or immaturity but no matter the reason, you can’t be certain that it won’t happen again. Thus, try to ensure that the two of them are never alone. That might involve acquiring additional help in your home (nurses aid, etc.) or perhaps installing a surveillance system.

I would highly recommend that you take him to counseling. The therapist will gather information about the details of the event, his psychosocial history, and so forth, and make a judgment about how to move forward and what kind of treatment is necessary. He needs to understand that what he did was wrong and nothing like this can ever happen again. It would be advisable for you to go to counseling with him, at least for the first few sessions. You need to be involved in his treatment. The therapist will offer you guidance about how to handle the situation and how to protect your daughter.

If this continues, your grandson risks going to jail and being labeled a sex offender. Even though he is quite young, and under the age of 18, he can still be labeled as a sex offender. In the United States, these individuals are referred to as juvenile sex offenders. This label can sometimes stay with them even into adulthood. Juvenile sex offenders are placed on registries much like their adult counterparts. Being on a registry can be a lifelong sentence. Obviously, that something the family would want to avoid.

Generally speaking, juvenile sex offenders tend to harm other children. Sometimes they target family members. Your daughter cannot fend for herself and thus may be an easy target for an offender. The best way to prevent this from happening again, is to seek treatment for your grandson. With the right help, future problems can hopefully be avoided. Good luck with your efforts. Please take care.

Dr. Kristina Randle

Child Sexual Bullying

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Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW

Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist and Assistant Professor of Social Work and Forensics with extensive experience in the field of mental health. She works in private practice with adults, adolescents and families. Kristina has worked in a large array of settings including community mental health, college counseling and university research centers.

APA Reference
Randle, K. (2020). Child Sexual Bullying. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 10, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2020/02/18/child-sexual-bullying/
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 17 Feb 2020 (Originally: 18 Feb 2020)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 17 Feb 2020
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.